Resting Water

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Baisao
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Sat Jul 11, 2020 2:52 pm

faj wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 1:18 pm
Baisao wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 1:05 pm
faj, I test all my teaware with led test kits. My concern does extend to teapots but I am not accusing any teaware makers.
Out of curiosity, have you had any test come out positive?

Are you using the kind of small swabs they sell to test for lead on painted surfaces?
No positives yet. I use the swabs from the big box store and they claim to work on hard, non-porous surfaces.
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Baisao
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Location: Austin, TX

Sat Jul 11, 2020 2:55 pm

faj wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 1:18 pm
Baisao wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 1:05 pm
faj, I test all my teaware with led test kits. My concern does extend to teapots but I am not accusing any teaware makers.
Out of curiosity, have you had any test come out positive?

Are you using the kind of small swabs they sell to test for lead on painted surfaces?
Along these lines but tangential: powdered turmeric is frequently adulterated with lead as color and filler. About 50% of what is sold in the US, even in ethnic groceries, is heavily contaminated with lead.

I’ve been wondering how to test for it. Perhaps my making it into a solution?
faj
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Sat Jul 11, 2020 6:37 pm

Baisao wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 2:52 pm
No positives yet. I use the swabs from the big box store and they claim to work on hard, non-porous surfaces.
I really wish there were an easy way to test for lead content in a liquid. It is hard to tell if these kits work on anything else they were not designed for.
faj
Posts: 399
Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2019 6:45 am
Location: Quebec

Sat Jul 11, 2020 6:55 pm

Baisao wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 2:55 pm
Along these lines but tangential: powdered turmeric is frequently adulterated with lead as color and filler. About 50% of what is sold in the US, even in ethnic groceries, is heavily contaminated with lead.
I read once that people in ancient Rome added lead to wine. I had no idea lead could be willfully added to something destined for eating nowadays. Quite chilling.
Baisao wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 2:55 pm
I’ve been wondering how to test for it. Perhaps my making it into a solution?
I wish I could help, but I have no idea if there is any way the general public can reliably test for lead. Given how common and dangerous it is, you would think there would be enough demand to justify bringing test kits to market that would be validated for more than just testing walls...
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TeaTotaling
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Sat Jul 11, 2020 7:29 pm

Speaking on water filtration, I have discovered several RO systems for under-the-sink use. There are some affordable options.

The benefits of filtering fluorine, chlorine, and bromine, amongst other contaminants would be well worth the additional cost up front.

The chemical concoction that is tap water (in the US at least) can really be detrimental to one’s health. I would highly prioritize water purity if one is considering a healthy tea practice.

🇺🇸
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Baisao
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Sat Jul 11, 2020 8:10 pm

TeaTotaling wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 7:29 pm
Speaking on water filtration, I have discovered several RO systems for under-the-sink use. There are some affordable options.

The benefits of filtering fluorine, chlorine, and bromine, amongst other contaminants would be well worth the additional cost up front.

The chemical concoction that is tap water (in the US at least) can really be detrimental to one’s health. I would highly prioritize water purity if one is considering a healthy tea practice.

🇺🇸
Unfortunately, RO makes execrable tea. Water needs minerals to assist in the the flavor and texture of tea.
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Baisao
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Sat Jul 11, 2020 8:15 pm

@faj, they were using lead acetate in wine and it was used until historically recent times as a sweetener, commonly called “sugar of lead”.

Regarding powdered turmeric, lead chromate is added to increase the weight of the bulk item and to make the color look more vibrant and eye catching to wholesale buyers. For now I am using fresh turmeric root in my cooking when powdered turmeric is called for.

And I agree: I wish it was easier to test for. Same for mercury and chromium.
.m.
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Sat Jul 11, 2020 9:57 pm

Baisao wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 8:15 pm
Regarding powdered turmeric, lead chromate is added to increase the weight of the bulk item and to make the color look more vibrant and eye catching to wholesale buyers. For now I am using fresh turmeric root in my cooking when powdered turmeric is called for.
I didn't know, that's crazy. There goes the "superfood". Normally, fresh turmeric tends to turn orange or reddish brown as it oxidizes, but returns to yellow in acidic environment, while the powdered stuff is always yellow, which means there must be always some color stabilizing procedure involved in making the powder.

Back to the topic of water resting: When storing for more then couple of days, i'd recommend to allow the water to breathe (e.g. keep the surface either uncovered or covered with a light cloth), otherwise a musty smell tends to develop (recurring problem with my water dispenser and gravity filtration systems). Plus cool and dark environment is obviously better.
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TeaTotaling
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Sun Jul 12, 2020 11:44 am

Baisao wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 8:10 pm
TeaTotaling wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 7:29 pm
Speaking on water filtration, I have discovered several RO systems for under-the-sink use. There are some affordable options.

The benefits of filtering fluorine, chlorine, and bromine, amongst other contaminants would be well worth the additional cost up front.

The chemical concoction that is tap water (in the US at least) can really be detrimental to one’s health. I would highly prioritize water purity if one is considering a healthy tea practice.

🇺🇸
Unfortunately, RO makes execrable tea. Water needs minerals to assist in the the flavor and texture of tea.
Understood.

There are plenty of good options for remineralization, after RO filtration. Some units even have an additional filter for this purpose. All hope is not lost @Baisao.

The driving point was to reduce the toxic load of contaminated water. Therefore, producing a purer cup of tasty tea.

🇺🇸
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Victoria
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Sun Jul 12, 2020 1:25 pm

TeaTotaling wrote:
Sun Jul 12, 2020 11:44 am
There are plenty of good options for remineralization, after RO filtration. Some units even have an additional filter for this purpose. All hope is not lost Baisao.

The driving point was to reduce the toxic load of contaminated water. Therefore, producing a purer cup of tasty tea.
I’ve heard tea drinkers mention using remineralized RO, but haven’t heard of specific consumer products that have been tested and are good with tea. My local city well water is remineralized RO and is very good with tea, the problem occurs when the city imports from other locations, and or uses one of its other wells, the water is way off with too much alkalinity and calcium/magnesium.
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TeaTotaling
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Sun Jul 12, 2020 2:01 pm

Victoria wrote:
Sun Jul 12, 2020 1:25 pm
TeaTotaling wrote:
Sun Jul 12, 2020 11:44 am
There are plenty of good options for remineralization, after RO filtration. Some units even have an additional filter for this purpose. All hope is not lost Baisao.

The driving point was to reduce the toxic load of contaminated water. Therefore, producing a purer cup of tasty tea.
I’ve heard tea drinkers mention using remineralized RO, but haven’t heard of specific consumer products that have been tested and are good with tea. My local city well water is remineralized RO and is very good with tea, the problem occurs when the city imports from other locations, and or uses one of its other wells, the water is way off with too much alkalinity and calcium/magnesium.
Aside from having your own RO system and installing a filter for remineralization, Trace Minerals Research makes drops to add to the water. I have personally used these in years past with good results. I can’t speak for tea, but it produced a much better French Pressed coffee, from my experience.

Also, dissolving something as simple as pure Himalayan Pink Salt could be a no frills option. I haven’t tested with tea, but coffee was much more flavorful. With this approach, dose and producing a homogeneous solution, could take some trial and error.

I have been using Spring Water for tea making, with superb results. It really aligns with my personal tastes. PH is 7.3-7.7, and TDS are 220-230.
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Baisao
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Sun Jul 12, 2020 2:17 pm

@TeaTotaling - I hear ya regarding safety.

I’ve been meaning to try the epsom salt and bicarbonate concentrate recommenced on the water page but it turned out the Berkey worked just fine with our local water. I should still give it a shot.

Another thing about resting water, in a way, is that some tea masters recommended to let the heated water stop moving or producing bubbles before pouring over tea. I do this because it was how I was taught but can’t say there’s a difference except in the purposeful feeling in my mind and actions.
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