Clay Kettles

foldedleaves
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Wed Dec 13, 2017 7:39 pm

Chadrinkincat wrote:
Sun Dec 10, 2017 10:23 pm
I recently bought a typical 70-80 zini teapot w/ filter basket that I'm planning to use as a kettle. Anyone else use these as kettles? I'm wondering if any extra precautions needed. I'd hate to crack it first time I use it.
I would be careful about using zisha over direct heat - most clays used for kettles are chosen because of their ability to cope with thermal shock, which allows them to be used over gas, charcoal, etc. Zisha, to my knowledge, isn't very good for this and may crack (maybe not the first use, but over time as the clay body is repeatedly stressed).

Global Tea Hut just commissioned zisha kettles and they recommend only using them over an alcohol flame, as it's a more gentle heat. However, this means heating the water in a different vessel before transferring it to the zisha kettle. I might follow the same guidelines with the pot you're talking about.
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Bok
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Thu Dec 14, 2017 3:57 am

Chadrinkincat wrote:
Sun Dec 10, 2017 10:23 pm
I recently bought a typical 70-80 zini teapot w/ filter basket that I'm planning to use as a kettle. Anyone else use these as kettles? I'm wondering if any extra precautions needed. I'd hate to crack it first time I use it.
I think those larger Yixing vessels are probably still meant to be teapots, but used in the way tea is brewed in North China, more akin to Western brewing, lots of water little leaf and also little control over the taste. Water kettles are normally made from different clays. See Chaozhou kettles for examples.
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tealifehk
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Thu Dec 14, 2017 4:16 am

I use a Chaozhou clay kettle on a Kamjove ceramic glass stove--I feel water from the kettle has a somewhat muting effect compared to my stainless kettle, but it is subtle.
Chadrinkincat
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Thu Dec 14, 2017 2:55 pm

Bok wrote:
Thu Dec 14, 2017 3:57 am
Chadrinkincat wrote:
Sun Dec 10, 2017 10:23 pm
I recently bought a typical 70-80 zini teapot w/ filter basket that I'm planning to use as a kettle. Anyone else use these as kettles? I'm wondering if any extra precautions needed. I'd hate to crack it first time I use it.
I think those larger Yixing vessels are probably still meant to be teapots, but used in the way tea is brewed in North China, more akin to Western brewing, lots of water little leaf and also little control over the taste. Water kettles are normally made from different clays. See Chaozhou kettles for examples.
Yes they're intended use is as a teapot but also I've seen a number of people mention using the exact one I have as a kettle so it's not in heard of. Two of those people are Teaism99 and Kyarazen.
Chadrinkincat
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Thu Dec 14, 2017 2:57 pm

foldedleaves wrote:
Wed Dec 13, 2017 7:39 pm
Chadrinkincat wrote:
Sun Dec 10, 2017 10:23 pm
I recently bought a typical 70-80 zini teapot w/ filter basket that I'm planning to use as a kettle. Anyone else use these as kettles? I'm wondering if any extra precautions needed. I'd hate to crack it first time I use it.
I would be careful about using zisha over direct heat - most clays used for kettles are chosen because of their ability to cope with thermal shock, which allows them to be used over gas, charcoal, etc. Zisha, to my knowledge, isn't very good for this and may crack (maybe not the first use, but over time as the clay body is repeatedly stressed).

Global Tea Hut just commissioned zisha kettles and they recommend only using them over an alcohol flame, as it's a more gentle heat. However, this means heating the water in a different vessel before transferring it to the zisha kettle. I might follow the same guidelines with the pot you're talking about.
I'm definitely gonna research a little more before I try using it.
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Shine Magical
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Mon Apr 30, 2018 8:35 am

What type of clay is good for a kettle and does anyone know of a place I can order one from? My instinct feels like duan ni wouldn't be good for a kettle.
I've seen a total of zero clay kettles for sale :D
Last edited by Shine Magical on Mon Apr 30, 2018 8:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Shine Magical
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Mon Apr 30, 2018 8:38 am

Bok wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 4:42 am
Going to get this thread started with my trusty clay kettle:
Special Japanese clay for use on stoves, thrown by my Taiwanese pottery teacher. The steam hole is strategically place on the rear side to avoid getting burned by the steam when handling.

Before first use I cooked some rice congee in it to seal the pores for future use. This kettle sweetens the water.
So nice!
I'm assuming that sweet water is better for gaoshan?
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ShuShu
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Mon Apr 30, 2018 9:59 am

Shine Magical wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 8:35 am
What type of clay is good for a kettle and does anyone know of a place I can order one from? My instinct feels like duan ni wouldn't be good for a kettle.
I've seen a total of zero clay kettles for sale :D
I think the most common ones are referred to online as "Chaozhou red clay" or something of this sort. Though I tend to prefer (and I wonder what others here think) cast iron or Japanese tetsubin
Edit: a quick google just revealed that many online vendors use CZ red clay to refer to CZ Zhuni and CZ DHP. I didn't mean that. I meant this kind of CZ red clay: https://www.chawangshop.com/tea-hardwar ... 0cc-a.html
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Bok
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Mon Apr 30, 2018 12:26 pm

ShuShu wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 9:59 am
Shine Magical wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 8:35 am
What type of clay is good for a kettle and does anyone know of a place I can order one from? My instinct feels like duan ni wouldn't be good for a kettle.
I've seen a total of zero clay kettles for sale :D
I think the most common ones are referred to online as "Chaozhou red clay" or something of this sort. Though I tend to prefer (and I wonder what others here think) cast iron or Japanese tetsubin
Edit: a quick google just revealed that many online vendors use CZ red clay to refer to CZ Zhuni and CZ DHP. I didn't mean that. I meant this kind of CZ red clay: https://www.chawangshop.com/tea-hardwar ... 0cc-a.html
The trouble with those CZ clay kettles is that you don’t really know what kind of clay they use these days. They are very, very cheap if you buy them on taobao and other non-western facing shops, so the base material quality can not be very high. Vintage ones are hard to come by.
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ShuShu
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Mon Apr 30, 2018 12:35 pm

Bok wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 12:26 pm
ShuShu wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 9:59 am
Shine Magical wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 8:35 am
What type of clay is good for a kettle and does anyone know of a place I can order one from? My instinct feels like duan ni wouldn't be good for a kettle.
I've seen a total of zero clay kettles for sale :D
I think the most common ones are referred to online as "Chaozhou red clay" or something of this sort. Though I tend to prefer (and I wonder what others here think) cast iron or Japanese tetsubin
Edit: a quick google just revealed that many online vendors use CZ red clay to refer to CZ Zhuni and CZ DHP. I didn't mean that. I meant this kind of CZ red clay: https://www.chawangshop.com/tea-hardwar ... 0cc-a.html
The trouble with those CZ clay kettles is that you don’t really know what kind of clay they use these days. They are very, very cheap if you buy them on taobao and other non-western facing shops, so the base material quality can not be very high. Vintage ones are hard to come by.
Agree. Personally, I found the care that ceramic kettles require a bit too much for me. Especially when it comes to expensive vintage. The fear of cracks or the facts that gas and electric fire makes cracks more likely, and their fragility just made me more inclined toward cast iron or rather cheap CZ kettles which are, as you say, hit or miss.
Rickpatbrown
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Thu Jan 10, 2019 7:33 pm

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I bought this Anta pottery clay kettle from Taiwan Sourcing. It doesnt seem to change the water that much, but I havent gotten around to a head to head with my electric kettle.

I do love how it pours. It is very precise and smooth.

This coupled with a $20 hotplate next to my couch makes my tea sessions so much more enjoyable than standing at the counter next to the electric kettle.
Teachronicles
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Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:56 pm

I just ordered a clay kettle from petr novak and will post pictures when I receive it, hopefully within the next few weeks. Heres some pictures petr took. From the side, you can see subtle effects from the wood firing.


Clay kettle
plamarca000
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Fri Jan 11, 2019 1:40 am

Very nice. I love his work.

I ordered the global tea hut kettle so I will post a review of it when it gets in
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Bok
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Fri Jan 11, 2019 2:12 am

Nice one! I suspect the iron rich clay might have some benefit on the water. I also like how he wrapped the handle.
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pedant
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Mon Jan 28, 2019 9:55 pm

today, i received a kettle by TSUNOKAKE Masashi:

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it appears to be glazed everywhere except for the the base of the exterior. the interior is glazed, but it still sweats profusely through bottom. the glaze must be porous. i look forward to seeing its effect on water.
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