Using kyusu for other kinds of green tea

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LuckyMe
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:30 am

I have a small Gisui clay teapot that I've been using exclusively for sencha for the past year or so. I also drink kamairicha and Chinese greens but brew them in a different vessel.

Would it be a good idea for me to brew all of my greens in the kyusu or would the taste get muddled from the clay absorbing different teas?

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Last edited by LuckyMe on Wed Dec 04, 2019 12:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Victoria
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 12:03 pm

It would depend on the clay and firing used on your kyusu. Can you share a picture and description?
Most green teas though won’t impart too much residue or aroma into denser clays. Also, cleaning after use with boiling water helps keep the kyusu free of heavier residue.
LuckyMe
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 12:25 pm

Oops, I linked a picture in my post but it didn't show up for some reason. Below are a couple of IG pics. It's a ~150ml pot with a sasame filter. The black clay doesn't seem too porous. Same tea brewed in a glazed teapot is similar. The main difference is the clay seems to remove the sulfuric/bitter edge that tea sometimes has.

https://www.thepicbear.com/share/BTmCFVZDemT

https://www.thepicbear.com/share/BgWzEXeBbbV
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Victoria
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 1:01 pm

That reduction fired clay looks pretty dense so shouldn’t absorb too many lipophilic compounds from the tea infusions. I have a similarly dense kyusu by Tokoname craftsman Gyokuryu (Mr. Umehara Jiro) that I use for many different green teas, and just make sure to clean with off boiled water after each use.

You might enjoy reading this research article Analysis of lipophilic compounds of tea coated on the surface of clay teapots.
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nasalfrog
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 1:04 pm

I have a red clay Gyokko that I use for roasted teas & when I travel. In my experience with it, I would say it should be fine unless you think a hint of flavor from your roasted greens wouldn’t go well with sencha.

I’ve only noticed a slight clash in flavor when I travel and use that pot with greener/lightly roasted kamairicha after having used it with a more heavily roasted tea like hojicha. It’s not bad, but it’s there, and I would say some teas would be better without the added hint of roastiness. When I’m home, I brew those kamairichas in a different pot that I also brew sencha in.
LuckyMe
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:55 pm

Thanks for the feedback everyone. Cleaning the kyusu after each use with boiling water is a good idea.

It seems brewing different green teas in the kyusu will have minimal affect on the taste. However I do like to be able to taste the individual nuances of every tea so for that reason, I'll continue to use my kyusu primarily for sencha and once in a while for other kinds of green tea. If the teapot ever gets tainted, soaking it overnight in baking soda and lukewarm water should help clean it.
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Bok
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Thu Dec 05, 2019 1:19 am

LuckyMe wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:55 pm
If the teapot ever gets tainted, soaking it overnight in baking soda and lukewarm water should help clean it.
Don't be shy to use boiling water, lukewarm water is not enough. For a real re-set you might consider using sodium percarbonate instead and slow-boiling it for a couple of hours.

But - slowly warm the pot, do not use boiling water inside from the start to avoid cracking it. Best practice is to pour water from the outside first, then inside.
LuckyMe
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Sun Dec 08, 2019 9:12 am

Bok wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 1:19 am
LuckyMe wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:55 pm
If the teapot ever gets tainted, soaking it overnight in baking soda and lukewarm water should help clean it.
Don't be shy to use boiling water, lukewarm water is not enough. For a real re-set you might consider using sodium percarbonate instead and slow-boiling it for a couple of hours.

But - slowly warm the pot, do not use boiling water inside from the start to avoid cracking it. Best practice is to pour water from the outside first, then inside.
The lukewarm water and baking soda bath is what Toru of Artistic Nippon recommended for cleaning when I purchased the teapot. My kyusu has been imparting off flavors to my tea lately so its time for a reset. I'll try cleaning with boiling water and baking soda and see how it goes.
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Victoria
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Sun Dec 08, 2019 10:37 am

LuckyMe wrote:
Sun Dec 08, 2019 9:12 am
Bok wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 1:19 am
LuckyMe wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:55 pm
If the teapot ever gets tainted, soaking it overnight in baking soda and lukewarm water should help clean it.
Don't be shy to use boiling water, lukewarm water is not enough. For a real re-set you might consider using sodium percarbonate instead and slow-boiling it for a couple of hours.

But - slowly warm the pot, do not use boiling water inside from the start to avoid cracking it. Best practice is to pour water from the outside first, then inside.
The lukewarm water and baking soda bath is what Toru of Artistic Nippon recommended for cleaning when I purchased the teapot. My kyusu has been imparting off flavors to my tea lately so its time for a reset. I'll try cleaning with boiling water and baking soda and see how it goes.
I recommend after baking soda clean with 1/3 white vinegar: water to completely remove baking soda. Vinegar will evaporate leaving no smell or taste. If any baking soda remains in pot it will make tea taste very bad.
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