Ode to the Kyusu

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Baisao
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Wed Sep 02, 2020 7:47 pm

Darbotek wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 5:53 pm
Got a Jozan IV pot, I’m calling it the Avocado Pot. I was in a hurry earlier so I didn’t get to spend too much time with it, but it brewed up some fantastic sencha.

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Really lovely kyusu you have there.
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Bok
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Wed Sep 02, 2020 8:12 pm

Darbotek wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 5:53 pm
Got a Jozan IV pot, I’m calling it the Avocado Pot. I was in a hurry earlier so I didn’t get to spend too much time with it, but it brewed up some fantastic sencha.

Image
To second/third/fourth everyone above – Lovely pot!

How is the handling when it's full? As the handle and shape is high I am wondering if it impedes a smooth pouring without too much stress on the wrist?
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Darbotek
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Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:07 pm

pedant wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 6:15 pm
stunning kyusu. that's a keeper.
Victoria wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 6:24 pm
Yes, Darbotek beautiful mayake Jozan IV. A treasure 🌞🍃.
Baisao wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 7:47 pm
Really lovely kyusu you have there.
Thank y'all (it feels weird to say that, I didn't make it, I just bought it lol). It's a lovely pot to brew with. Super comfortable, tight lid. Only odd thing is it's a dribbler, which considering the Yamadas are known for their spout design, struck me as odd. But I paid, what I consider, to be a very good price so I won't complain!
Bok wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 8:12 pm
To second/third/fourth everyone above – Lovely pot!

How is the handling when it's full? As the handle and shape is high I am wondering if it impedes a smooth pouring without too much stress on the wrist?
The handle shape and size force your hand very close to the pot, plus it's pretty light weight so it handles like a dream!


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Baisao
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Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:08 pm

Bok wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 8:12 pm
Darbotek wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 5:53 pm
Got a Jozan IV pot, I’m calling it the Avocado Pot. I was in a hurry earlier so I didn’t get to spend too much time with it, but it brewed up some fantastic sencha.

Image
To second/third/fourth everyone above – Lovely pot!

How is the handling when it's full? As the handle and shape is high I am wondering if it impedes a smooth pouring without too much stress on the wrist?
To answer indirectly: I have a tall kyusu by Taisuke Shiraiwa and it pours well. I don't feel any significant strain on the wrist. I prefer it for fukamushi-cha or sencha that has a lot of fines (when I get to the bottom of a bag) since these settle to the deeper bottom, thus resisting clogging the filter.
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Bok
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Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:10 pm

Baisao wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:08 pm
Bok wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 8:12 pm
Darbotek wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 5:53 pm
Got a Jozan IV pot, I’m calling it the Avocado Pot. I was in a hurry earlier so I didn’t get to spend too much time with it, but it brewed up some fantastic sencha.

Image
To second/third/fourth everyone above – Lovely pot!

How is the handling when it's full? As the handle and shape is high I am wondering if it impedes a smooth pouring without too much stress on the wrist?
To answer indirectly: I have a tall kyusu by Taisuke Shiraiwa and it pours well. I don't feel any significant strain on the wrist. I prefer it for fukamushi-cha or sencha that has a lot of fines (when I get to the bottom of a bag) since these settle to the deeper bottom, thus resisting clogging the filter.
I presume it would be good practice for this kind of pot not to fill to the brim anyways.
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Baisao
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Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:35 pm

Bok wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:10 pm
Baisao wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:08 pm
Bok wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 8:12 pm

To second/third/fourth everyone above – Lovely pot!

How is the handling when it's full? As the handle and shape is high I am wondering if it impedes a smooth pouring without too much stress on the wrist?
To answer indirectly: I have a tall kyusu by Taisuke Shiraiwa and it pours well. I don't feel any significant strain on the wrist. I prefer it for fukamushi-cha or sencha that has a lot of fines (when I get to the bottom of a bag) since these settle to the deeper bottom, thus resisting clogging the filter.
I presume it would be good practice for this kind of pot not to fill to the brim anyways.
I never do with any kyusu. At most 80% full with any of them because the pot is oscillated after the first infusion to clear the filter of stuck leaves. Water goes everywhere with a full kyusu as it is oscillated. It's very different than the Taiwanese style I was taught: 90°+ water, overflowing pot, skim the foam/fines (if any), replace lid, etc. Japanese style: 80°-, leave room from the lid, replace lid, oscillate 5 times, etc.
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pedant
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Thu Sep 03, 2020 2:03 am

Darbotek wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:07 pm
it feels weird to say that, I didn't make it, I just bought it lol
of course, but still, great score. :mrgreen:
the ash glaze on it is amazing.
Darbotek wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:07 pm
Only odd thing is it's a dribbler, which considering the Yamadas are known for their spout design, struck me as odd.

Image
Jozan IV perfected the dribble-proof spout, but not every one of his pots features it. yours does not have the magic spout.

here's a pair of similar mayake pots by Jozan IV:

Yamada Jozan IV: Magic Spout Comparison
Yamada Jozan IV: Magic Spout Comparison
jozan-iv-magic-spout-comparison.jpg (170.97 KiB) Viewed 979 times

the one on the left has a 'classic' spout like yours, while the one on the right has a magic, dribble-proof spout. observe how the spout's lip curves downards.

here's another example:
pedant wrote:
Tue Aug 06, 2019 8:22 pm
i'm drinking a kamairicha from thés du japon.
...
Image
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Bok
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Thu Sep 03, 2020 2:10 am

Maybe an earlier work of his?
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pedant
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Thu Sep 03, 2020 2:13 am

Bok wrote:
Thu Sep 03, 2020 2:10 am
Maybe an earlier work of his?
i don't think so. sometimes he just liked making more classic spouts or trying different things.
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Baisao
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Thu Sep 03, 2020 2:39 am

My experience with 1 Jozan II and multiple Jozan IIIs with various spout styles (bizarre even) has been that they are not dribble proof but it’s easy to make them not dribble with a wee bit of technique. It takes almost no time to adjust to them. IMHO they are easier to adjust to than my other non-Yamada kyusus.

The magic dribble-proof spouts are a gas though. I wish other makers appropriated the design into their kyusu. They are mesmerizing.
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Bok
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Thu Sep 03, 2020 2:41 am

Executive creative decision, I see.

I have to say, I think the Yamada-trademark-unfinished-look is much more harmonious as a whole when wood-fired, or with one of their glazes. For me it fits much less the red fired Shudei clay which benefits more from smooth finish, visually speaking. But that's just me.
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Bok
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Thu Sep 03, 2020 2:42 am

Baisao wrote:
Thu Sep 03, 2020 2:39 am
The magic dribble-proof spouts are a gas though. I wish other makers appropriated the design into their kyusu. They are mesmerizing.
A lot of them don't drink much tea, which makes maybe less susceptible for refining this kind of detail that are most annoying for frequent users.
faj
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Thu Sep 03, 2020 5:40 am

Baisao wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:35 pm
I never do with any kyusu. At most 80% full with any of them because the pot is oscillated after the first infusion to clear the filter of stuck leaves.
While I usually do not fill my kyusus entirely, I probably use them quite often above 80%. I would say typically leaves on the filter would not prevent pouring the tea out entirely, but they do slow down the flow somewhat, and make leaking from the top more likely when beginning to pour (I have very leaky lids on some pots I use often...).

What I usually do is I just hit the side of the teapot opposite to the spout against my hand, and the pack of leaves detaches from the filter while remaining otherwise undisturbed. When I use hohins, I will sometimes pour water inside the spout rather than from the top opening, which I do mostly not to disturb the leaves, but it also helps clearing leaves from the filter.
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Victoria
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Thu Sep 03, 2020 9:09 am

Agree with posters, none of my Yamada kiln kyusu drip. I’m wondering if there is an issue with the filter, or interior of the spout on your kyusu @Darbotek. Also, pour technique can help mitigate whether a kyusu drips or not.
faj
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Thu Sep 03, 2020 10:18 am

Baisao wrote:
Thu Sep 03, 2020 2:39 am
it’s easy to make them not dribble with a wee bit of technique.
Most of the time, I can get a messy teapot to behave somewhat and only drip a bit, but I am not good enough that it would not dribble at all. I have developed a simple trick to compensate for that.

I usually have a cloth laid flat which I use to rest the teapot and lid, just because I do not like to put them on a hard surface. What I do to compensate for my lack of technique is I wait until the pour has stopped and there is that final drop hanging from the spout, and while keeping the spout pointing down, I quickly touch the tip of the spout on the cloth, which absorbs the drop. Probably not the most elegant solution, but for my need it does the job...
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