Vacuum sealers?

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debunix
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Location: Los Angeles, CA

Tue Feb 26, 2019 8:14 pm

FYI another option:
I bought this vacuum sealer because it works with this attachment:

Image

which allows you to vacuum seal mason jars. It's not a good enough seal for safe canning, but it is a brilliant way to decrease deterioration of dry goods like grains, beans, dried peppers, spices and delicate teas that would be crushed in the usual bags. You can now buy wide mouth mason jars in 8 oz, and regular mouth jars that are 4 oz and work with one or the other of the two vacuum accessories.

They would need to be stored in a dark place, because they're not protected from light, but for a tea that is very delicate and fast-fading, it might be worth it.
swordofmytriumph
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Location: Seattle, USA

Wed Feb 27, 2019 10:09 am

Very nice. I’ll have to look into that cause I have a lot of mason jars.
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debunix
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Location: Los Angeles, CA

Wed Feb 27, 2019 12:31 pm

They're sturdy, cheap, and when you're using them for this kind of sealing, even the lids are reusable. The whole setup for the sealer, refills of bags, a dozen or two small jars and the accessories is similar to the cost of a few hundred grams of fine tea that will be better preserved and you'll get more out of it when well preserved. If you do a lot with delicate greens and green oolongs that come in large and not-vacuum-sealed packages....very worthwhile, even if you're not a bean-and-grain fanatic like me.
Rickpatbrown
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2018 11:10 pm
Location: Baltimore, Maryland

Fri Mar 08, 2019 7:50 am

I used a Foodsaver plastic jar with hose attachment for storing coffee over the 1 week that I drink it. It definitely makes the end of the bag taste much better than not vacuuming.

One thing that I always wondered about, though... what does the vacuum do to the plant material? Coffee seems a little more robust, but I worry about vacuuming contributing to release of important volatiles. This would be less of an issue with vacuum sealed bags, because there is little/no headspace above the tea compared to what you would see with a rigid container. This would be an interesting experiment ... maybe someone with more sensitive pallet could test.

If this is a problem, the biggest effect would be seen by vacuuming and opening every day. This is what I do with coffee, and I havent noticed it a problem worth solving, yet.

I've started to notice a drop off in my gaoshan's over the couple of weeks it takes for me to drink 150g. I think I'll start sealing half my bags when I open them. I'll just through the opened mylar bag into a clear food saver bag. Rolled oolong shouldnt get crushed.
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debunix
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Location: Los Angeles, CA

Sat Mar 09, 2019 11:15 am

I also have worried about repeated vacuum sealing and volatiles from tea. I bought the sealing system mostly for use with grains and beans where I am not worried about loss of volatiles. For tea, I have used it to seal one time only: divide a large package of tea into smaller packages, each of which holds enough tea for a week or two's use; or seal individual servings' worth, e.g., when sending some 'tasting' samples to tea loving friends and relatives. I've not used it to reseal my 'working' batch of tea daily.
swordofmytriumph
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Location: Seattle, USA

Sat Mar 09, 2019 6:20 pm

So I’ve been doing some research in the last week or so, and from what I’ve learned, for people who are doing long term storage, a combo of Mylar bag + oxygen absorber is favored because Mylar is completely impermeable to air. The plastic bags that are used for consumer grade teas do let a tiny amount of air in, and after a while they will reinflate, which is why it isn’t recommended to store food in vacuum sealed bags for more than a year unless you’re freezing it. Also they will let in other smells as well.

I’ve ended up deciding to go the Mylar route, plus that way I don’t have to worry about the volatiles of the tea as well. The only thing is I have to make sure to get absorbers which are the correct size for the size of bag I’ll be using. That’s next on my list of things to research.
Ethan Kurland
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Sat Mar 09, 2019 9:22 pm

Rickpatbrown wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 7:50 am


I've started to notice a drop off in my gaoshan's over the couple of weeks it takes for me to drink 150g. I think I'll start sealing half my bags when I open them. I'll just through the opened mylar bag into a clear food saver bag. Rolled oolong shouldnt get crushed.
150 grams of gaoshan consumed every couple of weeks! I want you for a customer!

At point of purchase my green gaoshan is vacuum-packed in sizes of 40, 50, or 60 grams. Other teas' packs are no bigger than 75 grams because I think once their packages are opened , the tea inside will eventually change. For your opened packs of green gaoshan. I suggest you get the tea tight at the bottom and clip just above it or roll the packet tightly and secure with bands. This can give you an extra week of peak results.
Rickpatbrown
Posts: 49
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Location: Baltimore, Maryland

Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:30 pm

Ethan Kurland wrote:
Sat Mar 09, 2019 9:22 pm

150 grams of gaoshan consumed every couple of weeks! I want you for a customer!
I can quit ANYTIME I want!!

Actually, it's looking more like a month to finish 150grams. I drink about 10grams a day at work in a 150mL gaiwan.
Ethan Kurland
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Thu Mar 14, 2019 12:58 pm

Rickpatbrown wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:30 pm
I can quit ANYTIME I want!!
That's funny! Even if use only 150 grams a month & you are not an addict, we want you..... Cheers
Last edited by Victoria on Thu Mar 14, 2019 4:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Mod edit: corrected quotes
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