The Hall China Company and classic American teapot designs

Korea, Europe, the Americas, and abroad
Post Reply
User avatar
mbanu
Posts: 601
Joined: Fri May 03, 2019 3:45 pm

Mon Dec 14, 2020 9:07 am

Someone scanned a catalog from 1948: http://www.laurelhollowpark.net/orp/hal ... a1948.html

This doesn't even include their more wild stuff, like the Donut and Football shaped teapots, although it does include The Cube. :)

I also like that it includes the sizes -- there is a stereotype that Americans have always liked super-sized everything, but that is not really so. There are quite a few 7 ounce and 8 ounce teapots offered. Also the side-handled "Manhattan" teapot, calling back to the former popularity of Japanese teas in the United States.
Attachments
hallcat05.JPG
hallcat05.JPG (86.65 KiB) Viewed 870 times
hallcat04.JPG
hallcat04.JPG (76.91 KiB) Viewed 870 times
User avatar
mbanu
Posts: 601
Joined: Fri May 03, 2019 3:45 pm

Sat Dec 19, 2020 11:32 am

As for what happened to Hall China, you could get many of these models (and sizes) of teapot up until this year; their local Ohio competitor Homer Laughlin bought them out in 2010. However, in 2020 they sold off the bulk of the brand to Steelite, who I imagine will turn it into a zombie. What's left of the Homer Laughlin factory now focuses on selling Fiestaware exclusively, including one 44 ounce teapot: https://fiestafactorydirect.com/pages/our-history

If they kept control of the designs, maybe they will show up again one day, though. :) (It looks like a few online suppliers still have leftover 10 oz. white Buffet pots, if anyone is curious.)
User avatar
mbanu
Posts: 601
Joined: Fri May 03, 2019 3:45 pm

Sat Dec 19, 2020 7:51 pm

The 1938 patent for the Airflow teapot, one of their classic designs. According to his obituary, Leonard Brindley was born in Stoke-on-Trent in England and moved to East Liverpool, Ohio in America in 1914.
Attachments
airflow.jpg
airflow.jpg (106.97 KiB) Viewed 770 times
User avatar
rdl
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue Jan 02, 2018 3:43 am

Sat Dec 19, 2020 11:05 pm

Upton Tea is working with Hall China and Homer Laughlin to produce their teapots. When they first announced the collaboration they did a really interesting historical write up of these companies until the present.
mbanu, I have been enjoying reading your research and discoveries that you have been posting. Thanks.
User avatar
mbanu
Posts: 601
Joined: Fri May 03, 2019 3:45 pm

Wed Dec 23, 2020 5:14 pm

Another interesting quirk -- they offered a metal spout tip option not as repair for damage, but on brand new pots that were expected to chip, such as those used in restaurants.

*Edit: Also interesting that the teapot on the right, which was a "Chicago Pot" in 1948, was being sold as a coffee or chocolate pot by the time of this advertisement. The Chicago pot is an interesting one because it is shaped like an Oktoberfest beer stein with a spout; I wonder what the history of that design is?
Attachments
nochip.jpg
nochip.jpg (786.19 KiB) Viewed 699 times
User avatar
mbanu
Posts: 601
Joined: Fri May 03, 2019 3:45 pm

Sun Dec 27, 2020 9:42 am

Hall also sometimes did collaborations with artists; this was a teapot, creamer, sugarbowl set by the ceramics artist Eva Zeisel.
Attachments
eva.jpg
eva.jpg (220.03 KiB) Viewed 640 times
User avatar
mbanu
Posts: 601
Joined: Fri May 03, 2019 3:45 pm

Mon Jan 11, 2021 6:25 am

Hall China also did patterned teapots, but most of them were various types of floral pattern. This one is a non-floral, nicknamed "Silhouette". Sadly, I don't know much about the symbolism behind the image. Apparently this was a popular pattern for "store premium" campaigns. This was a practice where a business would offer some item as a reward for buying a certain amount of their main product, usually something that was not available for purchase separately.

Given the Colonial design, maybe it is related to a historically significant meeting-place such as The Green Dragon Tavern in Boston where the Boston Tea Party was planned?
Attachments
hall-silhouette.jpg
hall-silhouette.jpg (368.79 KiB) Viewed 505 times
User avatar
mbanu
Posts: 601
Joined: Fri May 03, 2019 3:45 pm

Mon Jan 11, 2021 7:10 am

Apparently this pattern has another name, "Taverne". It looks like this name may have been invented by Harvey Duke, a Hall China collector who wanted a way to distinguish this pattern from another pattern named Silhouette produced by the Crooksville China Company that had a similar look. Was one a copy of the other, maybe? This is a Crooksville China Silhouette:
Attachments
crooksville.jpg
crooksville.jpg (366.48 KiB) Viewed 495 times
Post Reply