Rethinking the appropriate size of pots

User avatar
Baisao
Posts: 171
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:17 pm

Thu Nov 29, 2018 11:42 pm

Bok wrote:
Thu Nov 29, 2018 11:26 pm
Of course that is true. If it were only for that I’d stick to a gaiwan. But having tea is a wholesome experience and beautiful teaware, maybe even paired with historical relevance, adds a lot to the pleasure, for me at least.

I was more sceptical in the past of certain attributes of supposedly famous clays, but recently came across quite a few examples of why - if you find the right pot - clay can change everything!

Mostly, the nuances are too small though to justify the investment.
I wholeheartedly agree!
Ethan Kurland
Vendor
Posts: 212
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:01 am
Contact:

Sat Dec 01, 2018 12:37 am

I think I change what I use for preparation and drinking because I like to handle various types and sizes of teaware. Sometimes I want to hold delicate items; sometimes I prefer heavier pieces in my hands. Sometimes a small amount of tea seems to tease my tastebuds while other times tiny tastes seem like treasures to savor. What's nice is that this is not serious business, just variation.

My younger sister seems to worry about how to make her coffee. She fears situations like the use of a French press one morning when a drip method should have been used. I don't want to be like that.
User avatar
Baisao
Posts: 171
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:17 pm

Sat Dec 01, 2018 12:42 am

Ethan Kurland wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 12:37 am
My younger sister seems to worry about how to make her coffee. She fears situations like the use of a French press one morning when a drip method should have been used. I don't want to be like that.
I agree. I think that whatever we do should be a comfortable, natural extension of ourselves. Tea tastes bad when made neurotically, absent mindedly, or with a "paint-by-numbers" approach.

That said, there is a correct way to pour tea! :D
User avatar
Shine Magical
Posts: 287
Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2017 4:13 pm
Location: NYC

Sat Dec 01, 2018 8:35 am

From a high height to allow oxygen in?
User avatar
Baisao
Posts: 171
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:17 pm

Sat Dec 01, 2018 2:50 pm

Shine Magical wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 8:35 am
From a high height to allow oxygen in?
I can’t tell if you are joking. Tea should be poured like wine. We don’t want to bruise the tea or display ostentation in or movements. Watching a person pour is one of the best estimates of the maturity of a person’s practice.
User avatar
Shine Magical
Posts: 287
Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2017 4:13 pm
Location: NYC

Sat Dec 01, 2018 3:25 pm

Nope not joking, just trying to understand what you’re trying to communicate. I don’t drink alcohol but I just watched a video of how to pour wine and it just seemed like a normal pour, no special technique.

Are you saying don’t shake the pot to get the last few drops of tea out of the pot because that’ll agitate the leaves?

I’ve seen people pour water into a teapot from a high height to allow the water to aerate or that was something along the lines of their reasoning. And that’s the reasoning for having a kettle with a longer spout too.
User avatar
pedant
Admin
Posts: 491
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 4:35 am
Location: Chicago
Contact:

Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:16 pm

Shine Magical wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 3:25 pm
I’ve seen people pour water into a teapot from a high height to allow the water to aerate or that was something along the lines of their reasoning. And that’s the reasoning for having a kettle with a longer spout too.
haha, reminds me of @KyaraZen :D
POUND the leaf!
User avatar
Baisao
Posts: 171
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:17 pm

Sat Dec 01, 2018 11:23 pm

Shine Magical wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 3:25 pm
Nope not joking, just trying to understand what you’re trying to communicate. I don’t drink alcohol but I just watched a video of how to pour wine and it just seemed like a normal pour, no special technique.

Are you saying don’t shake the pot to get the last few drops of tea out of the pot because that’ll agitate the leaves?

I’ve seen people pour water into a teapot from a high height to allow the water to aerate or that was something along the lines of their reasoning. And that’s the reasoning for having a kettle with a longer spout too.
Thank you for clarifying.

I am speaking only of pouring tea. There are sometimes reasons for a vigorous pour of water into the tea vessel, but these are mostly a function of intention.

I think a normal pouring height does several things:

* It does not display an ostentatious attitude that places the preparer before the tea: preparer and tea are coequal.

* It is polite to guests who may not want to be splashed with tea if they are sitting close.

* It does not aerate the tea, changing its texture and accelerate oxidation in the cup. I had a sencha some years ago that would change color, presumably from oxidation, if it wasn’t consumed quickly enough (less than 5-10 minutes in a yunomi). Increasing the amount of surface area the tea has to oxygen before it passes the lips, has a bad affect on the beverage.

The first two points may not matter to anyone else but me, since they are matters of mindfulness and etiquette, but the third point is functional: fresh tea exposed to too much oxygen, in this case through vigorous agitation during pouring, rapidly begins to change the tea. This is not a good thing, in my opinion.

I can’t think of any fine beverage that benefits from a high pour.
.m.
Posts: 127
Joined: Wed Oct 11, 2017 3:26 pm

Sun Dec 02, 2018 12:10 pm

Ethan Kurland wrote:
Thu Nov 29, 2018 4:27 am
One might make comparisons trying to notice a difference; however, I must ask, "Does air on the surface of hot water get into the water?"

It reminds me when I criticized people saying boiling water takes oxygen out of the water. I argued then water boiling too long could become hydrogen. I don't think this happens, and I don't think water can become more than one part oxygen to two parts hydrogen. If lifting lids while pouring adds flavor, perhaps another explanation.....
Cheers
When people talk about boiling off the oxygen from the water, it does not refer to the O in H2O, but to the gas dissolved in the water (similar to how CO2 is dissolved in a sparkling water). The same kind of oxygen that fishes breathe. When a pond gets too warm in the summer the water looses the capacity to hold enough oxygen and the fishes die.
User avatar
Bok
Posts: 1042
Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:55 am

Sun Dec 02, 2018 7:04 pm

Baisao wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 2:50 pm
Shine Magical wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 8:35 am
From a high height to allow oxygen in?
I can’t tell if you are joking. Tea should be poured like wine. We don’t want to bruise the tea or display ostentation in or movements. Watching a person pour is one of the best estimates of the maturity of a person’s practice.
I can think of one possible circumstance where a pour from a height might be appropriate: For the first round of brew of an aged rolled oolong. Those are usually very tight and need some convincing to unfurl. One might use longer steeping instead, but depending on the tea that does not always work.
User avatar
Baisao
Posts: 171
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:17 pm

Sun Dec 02, 2018 7:10 pm

Bok wrote:
Sun Dec 02, 2018 7:04 pm
Baisao wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 2:50 pm
Shine Magical wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 8:35 am
From a high height to allow oxygen in?
I can’t tell if you are joking. Tea should be poured like wine. We don’t want to bruise the tea or display ostentation in or movements. Watching a person pour is one of the best estimates of the maturity of a person’s practice.
I can think of one possible circumstance where a pour from a height might be appropriate: For the first round of brew of an aged rolled oolong. Those are usually very tight and need some convincing to unfurl. One might use longer steeping instead, but depending on the tea that does not always work.
I agree but I am speaking of pouring tea not water.
User avatar
Bok
Posts: 1042
Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:55 am

Sun Dec 02, 2018 7:29 pm

Baisao wrote:
Sun Dec 02, 2018 7:10 pm
I agree but I am speaking of pouring tea not water.
I see, I misread!
Ethan Kurland
Vendor
Posts: 212
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:01 am
Contact:

Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:19 pm

.m. wrote:
Sun Dec 02, 2018 12:10 pm

When people talk about boiling off the oxygen from the water, it does not refer to the O in H2O, but to the gas dissolved in the water (similar to how CO2 is dissolved in a sparkling water). The same kind of oxygen that fishes breathe. When a pond gets too warm in the summer the water looses the capacity to hold enough oxygen and the fishes die.
Thank you. Now I have learned something which is lot a better than my attempts to figure things out.
Post Reply