Teas best suited for grandpa style

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Bok
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Location: Taiwan

Tue Oct 08, 2019 9:42 pm

leaves will sink down with time anyways, no need for a filter.
aet
Posts: 74
Joined: Tue Feb 06, 2018 7:56 pm
Location: Kunming ( China )

Wed Oct 09, 2019 12:23 am

Shine Magical wrote:
Tue Oct 08, 2019 8:42 pm
aet do they have a bottle that has a filter at the end for easier drinking or do they use their teeth to filter out the leaves?
no filter , that's for beginners ;-DDDD
they don't drink it until the leafs are soaked up properly and sit at the bottom of the bottle. When drink, tilt it gently so leafs almost not moving towards to the mouth. When getting to the end, the tilting motion is even slower. They don't drink it to the very end coz need some water left for more convenient to throw / spill out the leafs later. It's easier to spill it out when some water still inside rather than trying to pull out the leafs sicked to the walls and bottom of the glass bottle.
swordofmytriumph
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Location: Seattle, USA

Thu Oct 10, 2019 10:02 am

When I try this, the leaves take forever to sink (15 min at least, if not 20), and it isn’t as good as it would be if I drank it sooner. Am I doing something wrong? Am using Tea Habitat’s long jing. First infusion I do 140 degrees the. Up it to 175 the second and so on.
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Bok
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Location: Taiwan

Thu Oct 10, 2019 10:15 am

swordofmytriumph wrote:
Thu Oct 10, 2019 10:02 am
When I try this, the leaves take forever to sink (15 min at least, if not 20), and it isn’t as good as it would be if I drank it sooner. Am I doing something wrong? Am using Tea Habitat’s long jing. First infusion I do 140 degrees the. Up it to 175 the second and so on.
Usually grandpa style is about convenience, not optimal taste. Nothing wrong if it tastes like dish water, the point is that those original grandpas just don’t want to drink plain water!
swordofmytriumph
Posts: 331
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Location: Seattle, USA

Fri Oct 11, 2019 4:08 am

Bok wrote:
Thu Oct 10, 2019 10:15 am
swordofmytriumph wrote:
Thu Oct 10, 2019 10:02 am
When I try this, the leaves take forever to sink (15 min at least, if not 20), and it isn’t as good as it would be if I drank it sooner. Am I doing something wrong? Am using Tea Habitat’s long jing. First infusion I do 140 degrees the. Up it to 175 the second and so on.
Usually grandpa style is about convenience, not optimal taste. Nothing wrong if it tastes like dish water, the point is that those original grandpas just don’t want to drink plain water!
Ah! Well that does explain things. :lol: Cool. Thanks Bok!
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Baisao
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Location: Austin, TX

Wed Oct 16, 2019 5:35 pm

I stopped rinsing ages ago unless it’s puerh, which is dusty and/or pressed so a rinse significantly helps prep the tea.

Oolong, greens, yellows, and most whites generally don’t benefit at all from a rinsing. Well, maybe some minor benefit, chiefly that it makes it easier to nail the first steeping since it will be almost as short as the second. But with experience it becomes moot.
Teachronicles
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Joined: Tue Dec 12, 2017 1:13 am
Location: SF Bay Area, CA

Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:27 pm

Hmm wrote:
Mon Oct 07, 2019 11:05 am
Do people still do the initial "washing" of the leaves with grandpa style or is that step just completely gotten rid of? If so, how do they do it, if e.g. in a mug? If not, aren't they concern about dust, dirt, or pesticides, etc.?
For shou and aged sheng, if I do them grandpa style, I do still rinse and usually just grab something in the kitchen to stop the leaves from falling out, a big spoon, tea strainer, whatever's around and works.
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