Tea production in Nepal, culture in Poland, very old sheng, etc.

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John_B
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:42 am

Mon Sep 03, 2018 11:24 pm

I mentioned some interesting blog posts coming up here recently; these are 4 from the last 7 days.


http://teaintheancientworld.blogspot.co ... sheng.html

Basic stuff, reviewing a nice version of commissioned Jing Mai sheng from a Swiss vendor. I compared it to a slightly higher quality version to place how that works out, related to value, aspect variation, and style differences.


http://teaintheancientworld.blogspot.co ... land.html
More what I was talking about; what tea culture is like in Poland, based on input from a main Polish tea vendor and Youtube channel producer, a small shop owner in Warsaw, and a Polish tea enthusiast.


http://teaintheancientworld.blogspot.co ... side.html
Comparing 1980 and 1993 Thai sheng versions; an interesting experience on more than one level.


http://teaintheancientworld.blogspot.co ... ping.html
A small tea grower in Nepal talks about getting into tea processing as well, in a variation on a small co-op model.
Ethan Kurland
Vendor
Posts: 182
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:01 am
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Tue Sep 04, 2018 1:01 pm

John, Your comparison of the 1989 & 1993 Thai sheng is the best writing that you have done. Your analysis & description of flavors are wonderful. It makes one want to drink those teas; moreover, it reminds us drinking tea can be so richly pleasurable. (I beg you to save 6 or 7 grams of each & to allot some time for us to get together early December.)

I suggest to all drinkers, even those not into pu to read the comparisons.

Cheers
John_B
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:42 am

Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:15 am

Thanks Ethan! To some extent that turned into more a story about how the effects of the tea played out, but it was a challenge describing all the related parts of it.

Unfortunately I have very little left of one, the 1993 sample, and none of the other. I was given those to review, with the classic choice of drinking slightly more or slightly less than I would typically brew to try the 1980 version.

In this case there seemed to be a little more of the 1993 version, so to balance choosing going with more I still needed to narrow down that version's brewed amount size. I'll try to forget I have it; let what's left sink to the bottom of some collection of other teas for awhile.

I seem to be in the habit of giving away more tea than normal lately so the interesting versions I'm trying I tend to pass on to others. I just passed on small amounts of two Myanmar sheng and one Thai version to a friend today, who shared some Vietnamese sheng versions I've only tried one of in return. No matter when you visit there should be interesting tea around to try, which kinds just changes month to month.
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