Qin Xin Wulong

Post Reply
User avatar
Tillerman
Vendor
Posts: 143
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 4:58 pm
Contact:

Thu Nov 01, 2018 12:24 am

This month the Ultracrepidarian presents a few facts and much fun speculation about the origins and development of the qing xin wulong cultivar. You can check it out here https://tillermantea.net/2018/11/qing-xin/ and then give your own views on Taiwan's most widely planted tea tree.
User avatar
Bok
Posts: 922
Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:55 am

Thu Nov 01, 2018 1:21 am

Good article, thanks!
what you say about vague terms for names is something I have found does not only concern cultivars. Tea names and origin in general are often generalised or described in factually/scientifically wrong terms. Not on purpose in most cases, sometimes ignorance of the facts, or repetition of how it has been said for generations.

The ones who insist on proper terms want to know every detail of provenance are mostly nosy foreigners like us :mrgreen:
Personally, I stopped listening to background stories, they are mostly just that, stories... especially Western oriented shops do a lot of talking. But as they say you also have to walk the talk.

I much prefer to be in the dark – but sipping an excellent cuppa.
User avatar
pedant
Admin
Posts: 409
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 4:35 am
Location: Chicago
Contact:

Thu Nov 01, 2018 1:55 am

great article. i enjoyed reading it, and i can tell you spent time researching and writing it.
in a comment, you mentioned qing xin da mou (distinct from qingxin wulong). is that the typical cultivar used for dongfang meiren? do you know if da mou is commonly used in taiwan for other teas too? thank you
User avatar
Tillerman
Vendor
Posts: 143
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 4:58 pm
Contact:

Thu Nov 01, 2018 12:02 pm

pedant wrote:
Thu Nov 01, 2018 1:55 am
great article. i enjoyed reading it, and i can tell you spent time researching and writing it.
in a comment, you mentioned qing xin da mou (distinct from qingxin wulong). is that the typical cultivar used for dongfang meiren? do you know if da mou is commonly used in taiwan for other teas too? thank you
Qing xin da mou (also sometimes called qing xin da pan) is the main cultivar for OB in Miaoli and Hsinchu. In the Wenshan area one is more likely to find qing xin wulong or jin xuan. When OB is not in season (i.e. the bugs have gone) qing xin da mou produces Formosa oolong tea that, I'm told, is mostly sold in restaurants. TRES is working on small leaf black tea using qing xin da mou but apart from that I am not aware of it being used for any other well known teas.
Post Reply