Tianqingni Yixing Clay: Colour change after firing.

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mudandleaves
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Mon Mar 16, 2020 10:20 am

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In this week's blog we look at the colour change of Tian Qing Ni clay after firing from blue-gray to liver brown and the affect of firing the clay at different temperatures:
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https://www.mudandleaves.com/teatime-bl ... -to-teapot
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hopeofdawn
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Wed Mar 18, 2020 9:32 am

I really like the looks of these pots, and I've been looking for the right three-legged pot for quite a while. However, the size is a bit of a concern, esp. for single person gongfu sessions--is there a particular reason you decided to have the artist make them so large?
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Bok
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Wed Mar 18, 2020 9:41 am

hopeofdawn wrote:
Wed Mar 18, 2020 9:32 am
I really like the looks of these pots, and I've been looking for the right three-legged pot for quite a while. However, the size is a bit of a concern, esp. for single person gongfu sessions--is there a particular reason you decided to have the artist make them so large?
Chinese market mainly demands larger sizes these days...
faj
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Wed Mar 18, 2020 10:05 am

Bok wrote:
Wed Mar 18, 2020 9:41 am
Chinese market mainly demands larger sizes these days...
Could you explain a bit the reasons for that? Is related to use (i.e. serving more people, drinking larger portions, using lighter infusions or partial filling) or for aesthetic reasons (i.e. bigger pot looks better for decorative purposes)? Something else?
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Bok
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Wed Mar 18, 2020 10:17 am

@@faj it’s aways been the custom in most of China, except the southern parts where gong fu cha is practised.

The most popular teas in China are green teas, which also are better brewed in larger volumes.
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Youzi
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Wed Mar 18, 2020 10:40 am

faj wrote:
Wed Mar 18, 2020 10:05 am
Bok wrote:
Wed Mar 18, 2020 9:41 am
Chinese market mainly demands larger sizes these days...
Could you explain a bit the reasons for that? Is related to use (i.e. serving more people, drinking larger portions, using lighter infusions or partial filling) or for aesthetic reasons (i.e. bigger pot looks better for decorative purposes)? Something else?
Yes :D

(exactly all those things together)
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mudandleaves
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Thu Mar 19, 2020 9:11 am

hopeofdawn wrote:
Wed Mar 18, 2020 9:32 am
I really like the looks of these pots, and I've been looking for the right three-legged pot for quite a while. However, the size is a bit of a concern, esp. for single person gongfu sessions--is there a particular reason you decided to have the artist make them so large?
@Bok and @Youzi are correct.
The studio serves the Chinese market and demand is greater for larger teapots, especially when it comes to Yixing Teapots that aren't made of zhuni. Even in the south where gongfu brewing is more common, many families will often gongfu brew for 3 or more people. This is why 150ml pots are a popular size in southern China.

We were able to reserve enough clay at the studio for them to make us one batch of smaller Tian Qing Ni teapots - julunzhu teapots with a capacity around 130ml. EDIT: These should be out in a couple of weeks. They should be coming out in about a month.
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