The "Seven Sisters" magazines and their influence on American tea-culture

mbanu
Posts: 227
Joined: Fri May 03, 2019 3:45 pm

Tue Jan 05, 2021 11:38 am

One thing that struck me about a lot of these is that there is an assumption that the reader has more culinary knowledge than a reader today might have. For a jellied tea salad to turn out well, it would help to be familiar with aspic molds, for instance. I am guessing they assumed that the average reader would have learned basic garde manger skills in their home economics courses?

Julia Lee Wright was the director of the "Safeway Homemakers' Bureau", a kind of home economics promotional vehicle sponsored by Safeway grocery stores. Her real name was Julia Perrin Hindley. She also had a segment on the radio show, "Woman's Magazine of the Air" that was on NBC, but I haven't found any recordings. After she retired in 1964, the Julia Lee Wright name was apparently given to someone else, making it more resemble a Betty Crocker mascot situation. They did do a feature on her in her sorority bulletin, though.
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mbanu
Posts: 227
Joined: Fri May 03, 2019 3:45 pm

Sun Jan 10, 2021 1:40 pm

Not a Seven Sisters article, but rather one from a 1937 Esquire, a popular men's magazine. I think that the tone with which it talks about tea and tea-drinkers helps frame the context for how tea was viewed in the U.S. and why so much of the tea-culture was concentrated in certain places rather than others.
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faj
Posts: 496
Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2019 6:45 am
Location: Quebec

Sun Jan 10, 2021 2:15 pm

mbanu wrote:
Sun Jan 10, 2021 1:40 pm
I think that the tone with which it talks about tea and tea-drinkers helps frame the context for how tea was viewed in the U.S. and why so much of the tea-culture was concentrated in certain places rather than others.
Though I thought I would only read a few bits here and there, I ended up reading it top to bottom. That was a very entertaining read in several ways, some of which even had to with tea... :)
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