Hello from ChaChaBell

Vendor news and self-promotion
Post Reply
User avatar
ChaChaBell
Vendor
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon May 06, 2024 9:37 pm
Location: Shanghai, China
Contact:

Wed May 29, 2024 8:57 pm

Hey guy,

ChaChaBell is a team of tea and culture lovers, we're from different parts of the world and we're in this together due to the same passion we have. We hope to bring the best tea and products to all the tea lovers. :D

Visit us at: https://chachabell.com/

ChaChaBell.
User avatar
ChaChaBell
Vendor
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon May 06, 2024 9:37 pm
Location: Shanghai, China
Contact:

Tue Jun 04, 2024 10:43 pm

Here are the 6 most common fake teas that tea industry insiders are aware of, so tea lovers can avoid being deceived:

1. Artificially Colored Golden Eyebrow ("Jin Jun Mei") - Many e-commerce platforms sell gold-yellow colored Jin Jun Mei, leading new tea drinkers to believe authentic Jin Jun Mei should be entirely golden. But the "golden" in Jin Jun Mei refers to its precious, golden-like quality, not a completely yellow color. Authentic Jin Jun Mei should have a mix of gold, yellow, and black colors.

2. "50-Year-Old" Aged Ripe Tea - The technique of wet piling to produce aged ripe tea originated in Guangdong, and was later adapted by Yunnan tea companies starting in 1973. After 2 years of refinement, large-scale production began in 1975. So claims of "50-year-old" aged ripe tea are completely false.

3. "20-Year-Old" Ancient Tree Raw Pu-erh - Similar to the aged dark tea, claims of 20+ year ancient tree raw pu-erh cannot be true. The concept of ancient tree tea only started gaining popularity around 2007. Before that, ancient tree tea was virtually unknown and unsellable, so mixed harvests were common, not single-origin ancient tree teas.

4. Artificially Aged "Old White Tea" - There are many techniques used to artificially age white tea. Genuine naturally aged white tea should have an uneven, varied color. But much of the "old white tea" on the market has a uniform dark color, lacking luster and moisture, likely produced through wet piling fermentation.

5. "Ice Mountain/Banzhang Ancient Tree" Small Green Chenpi - Small green chenpi (tangerine peel) has been very popular lately, leading to fierce competition. Many unscrupulous sellers now claim their chenpi is made with ancient tree raw pu-erh from Ice Mountain or Banzhang - two extremely rare and precious ancient tree origins that are almost never used for ripe pu-erh.

6. "100-Year-Old" Duck Shit Aroma Cultivar - Duck shit aroma (also known as "orchid aroma") is another trendy tea. Sellers now often claim their duck shit aroma teas come from 100-year-old trees, but the original duck shit aroma mother plant is only around 80 years old.

These are the common fake teas that ChaChaBell has identified. Do you know of any other fake teas to be aware of? Please share in the comments to help more tea lovers avoid being deceived.
Attachments
WechatIMG4418.jpg
WechatIMG4418.jpg (136.09 KiB) Viewed 305 times
User avatar
ChaChaBell
Vendor
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon May 06, 2024 9:37 pm
Location: Shanghai, China
Contact:

Mon Jun 10, 2024 8:00 am

To brew a good pot of tea, the steeping time is very crucial. It affects the taste of a cup of tea, but many tea enthusiasts don't know how long to steep a tea, leading to inconsistent taste profiles from one brew to the next. So we want to provide the recommended steeping times for the six major tea categories for everyone.

1. Green Tea: The first infusion should be steeped for 12 seconds or less.
Green tea is an unfermented tea, so the tea leaves retain most of the nutrients from the fresh leaves. When brewing green tea, the water temperature should not be too high, with 80°C (176°F) being ideal. The steeping time also should not be too long, otherwise it will damage the active compounds in the tea leaves.

2. Yellow Tea: The first infusion should be steeped for 15 seconds or less.
Yellow tea is lightly fermented, and its characteristics are quite similar to green tea. When brewing, you only need to steep it for 2-3 seconds longer than the recommended time for green tea.

3. Black Tea: The first infusion should be steeped for 10 seconds or less.
For black tea, the steeping time generally does not need to be too long. For the first few infusions, 10 seconds or less is sufficient to extract the tea liquor. If the steeping time is too long, it can easily result in a bitter and astringent tea. This is the general principle. However, you can make minor adjustments based on your personal taste preferences and the specific circumstances, while still keeping within this overall guideline.

4. For white tea The first infusion should be steeped for 10 seconds or less.
For New White Tea:
Use a covered brewing vessel (gaiwan)
For the first 3 infusions: Steep for 10 seconds
4th infusion: Use 100°C water, steep for 20 seconds
5th infusion: Use 100°C water, steep for 30 seconds

For Aged/Older White Tea:
Aged White Tea Cakes:
Starting from the 2nd infusion, increase the steeping time by 3-5 seconds compared to new white tea
Still, do not over-steep

Aged Loose Leaf White Tea:
Due to extended aging, the leaves contain richer compounds
The steeping time needs to be even shorter, otherwise it can become bitter and astringent
In summary, whether it's new white tea or aged white tea, the steeping time needs to be carefully controlled to avoid over-extraction and bitterness. New tea and aged tea require slightly different handling. These detailed guidelines are very helpful, thank you for sharing!

5. For oolong tea: The first infusion should be steeped for 10 seconds or less.
Oolong tea is meticulously crafted to achieve a partially oxidized state, known as "doing green" (青). Due to this careful processing, oolong tea is able to release its flavors and aromas very quickly during brewing. Therefore, the first infusion of oolong tea only requires a very short 10-second (or less) steeping time.

6. For black tea: The first infusion should be steeped for 20 seconds or less.
Black tea is made from relatively coarse, aged tea leaves.
After the fermentation process, the water-soluble compounds in black tea leaves are released more slowly compared to other tea types.
Additionally, much black tea is compressed into tightly compressed cakes or bricks.
These compressed tea leaves require some time to fully open and unfurl during the initial infusion.
User avatar
Bok
Vendor
Posts: 5806
Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:55 am
Location: Taiwan

Tue Jun 11, 2024 1:57 am

Agree to disagree.

Those are very general recommendations and don’t work in all instances, or can be ignored, especially in terms of temperature.

For oolong for example, a rolled Taiwan oolong needs a much longer first infusion than 2nd or third steep(and at full heat water).
Post Reply