Yee On Tea Co. - 義安茶莊

Vendor news and self-promotion
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YeeOnTeaCo
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Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2020 3:58 am
Location: Hong Kong
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Sat Oct 10, 2020 5:08 pm

Balthazar wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 2:10 pm
vuanguyen wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 12:33 pm
If you want to use the 10% discount, make sure you order it in Hong Kong dollar and not in your home currency.
YeeOnTeaCo: "We still have warehouses with "Tradition HK" storage in the most traditional sense for clients who still prefer it." - Are any of these teas available on your site? If so, could you list some examples? Personally, I'd find it useful to see this (storage category) as a choice in the "Filter" options of the site.
Thanks for the tip with the filter! 😊

Currently, all of our online stock is from our modernised warehouse, we only sell traditional storage tea to our local market through our retail store due to demand. So if there is a demand abroad we can surely cater to it.

Having said that, everything we stocked prior to the late 90s have gone though a period of traditional storage and then moved to our modernized facilities since.
vuanguyen
Posts: 95
Joined: Mon Mar 02, 2020 6:06 pm
Location: San Jose, California

Sat Oct 10, 2020 9:59 pm

YeeOnTeaCo wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 5:08 pm
Balthazar wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 2:10 pm
vuanguyen wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 12:33 pm
If you want to use the 10% discount, make sure you order it in Hong Kong dollar and not in your home currency.
YeeOnTeaCo: "We still have warehouses with "Tradition HK" storage in the most traditional sense for clients who still prefer it." - Are any of these teas available on your site? If so, could you list some examples? Personally, I'd find it useful to see this (storage category) as a choice in the "Filter" options of the site.
Thanks for the tip with the filter! 😊

Currently, all of our online stock is from our modernised warehouse, we only sell traditional storage tea to our local market through our retail store due to demand. So if there is a demand abroad we can surely cater to it.

Having said that, everything we stocked prior to the late 90s have gone though a period of traditional storage and then moved to our modernized facilities since.

I know what traditional Hong Kong storage is. But what is considered modernized warehouse storage? That is, can you tell us the temperature and humidity setting of your modernized warehouse? Do you allow for air exchange or is this a close system?

I am very curious and I find this subject fascinating.

Thank you in advance.
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Balthazar
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Location: Oslo, Norway

Sun Oct 11, 2020 1:12 am

faj wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 4:06 pm
I think both the credit card system company (e.g. Visa, Mastercard) and the card issuer (i.e. your bank) charge fees, and your 1% may only be one part of what you are truly charged in the end. Those cartel-like structures extract incredibly high rents on consumers.
Vendors will usually have to pay bank fees for currency conversion too, which is one of the reasons it's usually cheapest to buy in store's local currency (another being the risk of fluctuations in exchange rates, unless the vendor uses a very dynamic pricing with hourly updates, which will not convey a sense of reliability to consumers).

You example with a Japanese vendor offering better prices in CAD is fascinating. Unless the vendor has a bank that does not charge anything for currency conversion they must be taking on losses.

But enough thread derailing from me, maybe this should be moved to a currency exchange thread :)
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StoneLadle
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Location: Malaysia

Sun Oct 11, 2020 2:16 am

I know of some people here in Malaysia who would be delighted to have traditional stored cakes available for online order, myself included!
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Balthazar
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Location: Oslo, Norway

Sun Oct 11, 2020 2:23 am

Yeah, me too! Especially here in the west it's really hard to come by traditional storage done well.
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YeeOnTeaCo
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Mon Oct 12, 2020 1:32 am

vuanguyen wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 9:59 pm

I know what traditional Hong Kong storage is. But what is considered modernized warehouse storage? That is, can you tell us the temperature and humidity setting of your modernized warehouse? Do you allow for air exchange or is this a close system?

I am very curious and I find this subject fascinating.

Thank you in advance.
Just think what an ikea warehouse is like in terms of racking so tea is not piled on top of each other for easier quality and inventory management.

I can't speak for all the tea warehouses in HK, but for us, we like to keep things natural by using industrial warehouses which have particular attributes so that temperature (around 30deg) and humidity (around 70%-80%RH) stay relatively constant throughout the year without using heaters in winter or AC in summer.

Technically how that's done, we can't give away too much! Sorry!
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YeeOnTeaCo
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Mon Oct 12, 2020 1:34 am

StoneLadle wrote:
Sun Oct 11, 2020 2:16 am
I know of some people here in Malaysia who would be delighted to have traditional stored cakes available for online order, myself included!
Balthazar wrote:
Sun Oct 11, 2020 2:23 am
Yeah, me too! Especially here in the west it's really hard to come by traditional storage done well.

Awesome 8-) , we'll list some on our website soon for all to enjoy.
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wave_code
Posts: 172
Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2018 2:10 pm
Location: Germany

Mon Oct 12, 2020 2:46 pm

I thought I had sent you a PM but now it looks like it didn't go through for some reason, so might as well ask here. I saw you have one liuan and two liu bao listed on your website- not sure if you care to share but are the liu bao CNNP, Three Cranes, or another producer, or teas that were made to your specifications? Are they also traditional HK storage or do you have a different process for them?

also if you have others when you have a chance maybe consider putting them online too - there are those of us out here looking for non-pu HK teas too, and they seem even harder for those of us here in the west to find :D
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YeeOnTeaCo
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Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:12 pm

We have various Liuan and Liu Bao not list on our site, and we plan to have these online soon after many requests since our launch. The 2006 and 2008 Liu Bao listed on the website are from 八中茶,Guangxi branch. We do have an 80s one also which is our own recipe.

Although we are known for Puerh, we do also have a strong history with the Liuan and Liu Bao having exported many to Malaysia back in the 70s-80s.

Stay tuned for the update when they are listed online!
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YeeOnTeaCo
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Tue Oct 27, 2020 10:33 pm

StoneLadle wrote:
Sun Oct 11, 2020 2:16 am
I know of some people here in Malaysia who would be delighted to have traditional stored cakes available for online order, myself included!
Balthazar wrote:
Sun Oct 11, 2020 2:23 am
Yeah, me too! Especially here in the west it's really hard to come by traditional storage done well.
Sneak peek at two Traditional "Cellar" Stored Puerh coming soon....

2008 "Taste of Hong Kong" Raw Puerh (Cellar Storage)
2008 "Taste of Hong Kong" Raw Puerh (Cellar Storage)
Instagram-4172-3.jpg (450.18 KiB) Viewed 121 times
2009 Lao Man'E  (Cellar Storage)
2009 Lao Man'E (Cellar Storage)
Instagram-4291.jpg (372.69 KiB) Viewed 121 times
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Balthazar
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Wed Oct 28, 2020 3:05 am

@YeeOnTeaCo: Very interesting! :)
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StoneLadle
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Location: Malaysia

Wed Oct 28, 2020 3:57 am

@YeeOnTeaCo

Wow!!

Could you perhaps elaborate a bit on the differences between the 'cellar stored' teas and the teas stored in your professional warehouse? I am assuming that 'cellar stored' would refer to 'dey-chong', sorry for my poor transliteration into Cantonese??
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wave_code
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Wed Oct 28, 2020 5:21 am

also I'm intrigued by this if you know any details- https://yeeonteaco.com/collections/blac ... e-tea-cake

since this is using material from both Yunnan and Guangxi but is listed under black tea and since it says its raw, is it 'raw' as liu bao can be and the material just had a very light fermentation, or was it processed like sheng? or is it almost like an early days shu cake?
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YeeOnTeaCo
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Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2020 3:58 am
Location: Hong Kong
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Wed Oct 28, 2020 5:37 am

StoneLadle wrote:
Wed Oct 28, 2020 3:57 am
@YeeOnTeaCo

Wow!!

Could you perhaps elaborate a bit on the differences between the 'cellar stored' teas and the teas stored in your professional warehouse? I am assuming that 'cellar stored' would refer to 'dey-chong', sorry for my poor transliteration into Cantonese??
That's a pretty good transliteration :D

Our cellar stored tea are those which are in these "dey-chong" which is how tea vendors in HK stored their tea back in the days. Due to the real-estate landscape in HK, most of these are long gone replaced by high rise apartments, but we are lucky enough to still own two of these cellars where we store teas we know the local market will appreciate and teas that we know will benefit from this type of storage.

As opposed to our professional warehouse, these are our temperature and humidity regulated above ground industrial warehouse which you'll find the majority of HK tea vendors are doing.
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YeeOnTeaCo
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Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2020 3:58 am
Location: Hong Kong
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Wed Oct 28, 2020 5:56 am

wave_code wrote:
Wed Oct 28, 2020 5:21 am
also I'm intrigued by this if you know any details- https://yeeonteaco.com/collections/blac ... e-tea-cake

since this is using material from both Yunnan and Guangxi but is listed under black tea and since it says its raw, is it 'raw' as liu bao can be and the material just had a very light fermentation, or was it processed like sheng? or is it almost like an early days shu cake?
So sorry for the confusion! I was sorting out the categories just a few days ago and took all the teas without Puerh in the title and moved it *ooops*.

It's made the same way as a raw Puerh, using materials from Yunnan and Guangxi, but made in Guangdong, hence technically not a "Pu-erh" :lol:
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