Heat porcelain teapot on a candle stove?

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Bok
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Wed Jul 10, 2019 9:38 pm

Got a (maybe dumb) question:
Can you put any porcelain teapot on a stove with a tea candle?

Background is that I am looking into slow-boiling tea and do not like most porcelain teapots that are obviously fit to do so, like the ones used in Chinese restaurants.

I do not want to use clay, glass, or other materials.
I also do not really want to boil-boil it with a high heat source, just slow-heat it with a candle.

I know that as far as clay is concerned, special heat-proof clay is necessary, but I do know less about porcelain. A research on the web has not really given me a 100% answer.

Seems that a localised source of heat might cause cracking in porcelain, just wondering if a small candle is enough to cause that? This kind of tea-stoves are common in Europe, usually used with medium-thick porcelain pots.

Any input is appreciated, thanks!
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Victoria
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Wed Jul 10, 2019 9:51 pm

Not sure how a candle will give you a slow boil, it will keep tea warm though. I think most thicker bottom porcelain pots will be okay over a candle. I use a heating pad with many of my teapots, without any issues. It’s nice with later longer steeps that have cooled down. Also, fun to play with different extraction levels and timing when a constant source of low heat is applied to steeping leaves.
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Bok
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Wed Jul 10, 2019 10:04 pm

Victoria wrote:
Wed Jul 10, 2019 9:51 pm
Not sure how a candle will give you a slow boil, it will keep tea warm though.
This is a recommendation from an experienced drinker for as how to best extract the last bits of premium Yancha. Low heat for a few hours instead of aggressive boiling. I also think it should be fine, yet I know from experience with Western teapots and stoves that the heat is nonetheless not too small if applied constantly.
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pedant
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Wed Jul 10, 2019 11:52 pm

I think it's hard to say if it will break the pot or not. Depends on the pot and on how close to the flame it is. I wouldn't try it with a precious pot.

Also the heating pads work well. That's a legit alternative.
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Victoria
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Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:44 am

Yes right, the heating pad does exactly what you are looking for “extract the last bits of premium Yancha”, without the possibility of damaging your finer older teaware. A modern alternative to a traditional method. I have left my teaware unattended for several hours without issue to teaware, although the tea was over extracted after so long :shock: . Low constant heat for more than 1 hour has interesting results, though often very tannic tasting.
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Bok
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Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:47 am

I’ll check it out! Thanks guys...
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Victoria
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Thu Jul 11, 2019 10:12 am

I just updated my original post’s link to the heating pad;

Mug Warmer Coffee Cup Warmer for Desk Auto Shut Off - Electric Candle - Warmer Hot Coffee Plate Accessories for Tea Beverage Cocoa Milk and Best Gift for Coffee Lovers
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Tor
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Sun Jul 14, 2019 9:04 am

You might want to consider a borosilicate glass tea pot. There’re many of them from China. You can also see the color of the broth and decide if it’s ready, or if you need to adjust the heat, etc.

Edited: Oh! I just saw you said you didn’t want to use glass...
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Bok
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Sun Jul 14, 2019 11:21 am

Tor wrote:
Sun Jul 14, 2019 9:04 am
You might want to consider a borosilicate glass tea pot. There’re many of them from China. You can also see the color of the broth and decide if it’s ready, or if you need to adjust the heat, etc.

Edited: Oh! I just saw you said you didn’t want to use glass...
No worries! I was looking into glass as well, but it seems porcelain is more suitable in terms of enhancing the taste. Glass is probably dead neutral to the point of being bland, which is why I wanted to avoid it.

But there are a few tempting glass creations coming out of China and Japan... just didn’t find a good enough reason to get one :)
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Baisao
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Wed Jul 17, 2019 5:50 pm

I read what you were asking but thought I would through it my two bits.

Some Japanese bofura have a glazed interior and can take the heat without shattering. While they are on the large size 300-500ml, they wouldn't change the flavor of the tea like clay would. These would be ideal for traditional boiled sencha using zairai.

Second, candles produce a lot of soot. I would look to cleaner burning fuels like ethyl alcohol or electric.

Sounds like you are on your way though.

Cheers!
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Bok
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Wed Jul 17, 2019 7:39 pm

@Baisao thanks! Educate my Japanese teaware ignorance, what is a Bofura?
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Baisao
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Wed Jul 17, 2019 7:51 pm

Bok wrote:
Wed Jul 17, 2019 7:39 pm
Baisao thanks! Educate my Japanese teaware ignorance, what is a Bofura?
It's a small ceramic kettle used in senchado. It sits on a ryoro, usually heated with charcoal. Most bofura are white and porous but some are made of brown clay and are glazed inside. The white ones are popular in the chaxi community is Taiwan. The brown ones would be used for making traditional boiled tea or just heating water for modern tea.

Here is a white clay bofura with ryoro
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Bofura with ryoro
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Bok
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Wed Jul 17, 2019 8:11 pm

@Baisao thanks!

Yes, I have seen those around, although I think they do originally come from Chaozhou, where they are still produced in very similar designs.
You would not happen to have an image or link of how the brown ones look like?
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Baisao
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Wed Jul 17, 2019 9:06 pm

Bok wrote:
Wed Jul 17, 2019 8:11 pm
Baisao thanks!

Yes, I have seen those around, although I think they do originally come from Chaozhou, where they are still produced in very similar designs.
You would not happen to have an image or link of how the brown ones look like?
Correct. I sent you pics of my own two via a different service.
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