Fuzhuan storage advise needed

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Julie
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Thu Aug 10, 2023 4:43 pm

Recently, I've started drinking fuzhuan. I've got three small (200-300gr) bricks and a few samples. Aging isn't a concern as I buy to drink. (Daily drinker here.) Also, I live in a high mountain desert climate with little humidity.

For puerh, I've been storing in mylar bags with Boveda packs, and this has worked out well for those cakes.

How should I store my fuzhuan?
  • I've read two opposing thoughts about fuzhuan: one storage thought says to raise the humidity, the other says keep humidity away so the bricks don't mold. What's a person to do?
  • I have a large ceramic crock that's rather air tight and thought this might be good for the bricks. Yay or nay?
Appreciate your sharing your concerns, experience, and wisdom.

EDITED for OOPS: I meant to post this in the storage area. Can the moderator move it, or should I delete and repost there? kind regards
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Victoria
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Thu Aug 10, 2023 5:18 pm

Hope this helps, moved your post to Storage. Welcome to TeaForum 🍃
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Julie
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Thu Aug 10, 2023 7:11 pm

Thank you, Victoria!
.m.
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Thu Aug 10, 2023 11:20 pm

I don't have any particular experience with fuzhuan, but my guess would be to store them like sheng puerh.
As for Mylar bags and mold: if you seal 69% Boveda in a mylar bag with tea, chances are it will eventually start developing some mold, like after a few years. I've made this experience, and it has been reported by others as well, e.g. https://mgualt.com/tealog/2020/03/24/ri ... d-storage/ However, if you open the bag regularly every couple of months, you're most likely be fine: I do that often with puerhs that are in my drinking rotation. Obviously, I cannot give you particular data when it is safe and when not.
If you use the ceramic crock add the Boveda pack on top your tea, you'll see how fast or slow it will take it to dry out.
Bourder
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Fri Aug 11, 2023 12:10 am

On the topic of fuzhuan storage, does the Jin Hua spread?
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Julie
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Fri Aug 11, 2023 1:57 pm

.m. wrote:
Thu Aug 10, 2023 11:20 pm
I don't have any particular experience with fuzhuan, but my guess would be to store them like sheng puerh.
As for Mylar bags and mold: if you seal 69% Boveda in a mylar bag with tea, chances are it will eventually start developing some mold, like after a few years. I've made this experience, and it has been reported by others as well, e.g. https://mgualt.com/tealog/2020/03/24/ri ... d-storage/ However, if you open the bag regularly every couple of months, you're most likely be fine: I do that often with puerhs that are in my drinking rotation. Obviously, I cannot give you particular data when it is safe and when not.
If you use the ceramic crock add the Boveda pack on top your tea, you'll see how fast or slow it will take it to dry out.
Thank you for chiming in! Yes, my puerhs are fine and the bags get open regularly. Using 62% Bovedas for the last two years with no mold issues.

But completely unsure about what may happen with fuzhuan, so hoping some folks who have more of it than I will also chime in. Perhaps @Balthazar? who seems to know a great deal.
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Julie
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Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico

Fri Aug 11, 2023 2:00 pm

Bourder wrote:
Fri Aug 11, 2023 12:10 am
On the topic of fuzhuan storage, does the Jin Hua spread?
I don't have personal experience, but have read that the Jin Hua can spread. That's why I'm keeping the fuzhuan completely away from puerh. Even using different pick and tray for the fuzhuan.
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Balthazar
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Fri Aug 11, 2023 2:15 pm

.m. wrote:
Thu Aug 10, 2023 11:20 pm
I don't have any particular experience with fuzhuan, but my guess would be to store them like sheng puerh.
As for Mylar bags and mold: if you seal 69% Boveda in a mylar bag with tea, chances are it will eventually start developing some mold, like after a few years. I've made this experience, and it has been reported by others as well, e.g. https://mgualt.com/tealog/2020/03/24/ri ... d-storage/ However, if you open the bag regularly every couple of months, you're most likely be fine: I do that often with puerhs that are in my drinking rotation. Obviously, I cannot give you particular data when it is safe and when not.
If you use the ceramic crock add the Boveda pack on top your tea, you'll see how fast or slow it will take it to dry out.
+1 to this. Treating them similar to sheng puer has been working well for me. I think most fuzhuans can be neglected a bit more than shengpu without as dramatic a (negative) effect, but for prolonged storage they seem to benefit from heat and humidity (just not too much of it) and go flat in your typical "non-SEA/EA natural storage" environment.

Julie wrote:
Thu Aug 10, 2023 4:43 pm
  • I've read two opposing thoughts about fuzhuan: one storage thought says to raise the humidity, the other says keep humidity away so the bricks don't mold. What's a person to do?
I think "Where you stand depends on where you sit" when it comes to this. For those located in climates with a generally high relative humidity with sudden spikes, keeping the humidity at bay becomes most important (e.g. I know some Anhua heicha fans from Fujian that need to take care in the wet season). For most of the members of this forum, the oppositve problem (generally too low humidity and temperatures) is more pressing.

Plenty of sheng pu wrappers suggest you store the teas in a dry and cool place too, doesn't mean it's good advice. The proof is in the pudding. While the effect is not as dramatic as for pu, I generally prefer fuzhuans stored in Malaysia to those stored in e.g. Kunming.

As for crock storage I think that should be fine for the short term, though I'd opt for mylar myself if that's also an option.
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Julie
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Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico

Fri Aug 11, 2023 3:23 pm

Thank you for the detailed reply. Both of you, Balthazar and .m. It was helpful, and encouraging, to read about treating the fuzhuan much the same as sheng.

So: Mylar and Boveda it shall be for my fuzhuan. Will be keeping a good eye on my tiny stash. Look forward to learning how they fare in my environment.

Again, kindest regards for the guidance.

Cheers,
Julie
Balthazar wrote:
Fri Aug 11, 2023 2:15 pm
.m. wrote:
Thu Aug 10, 2023 11:20 pm
I don't have any particular experience with fuzhuan, but my guess would be to store them like sheng puerh.
As for Mylar bags and mold: if you seal 69% Boveda in a mylar bag with tea, chances are it will eventually start developing some mold, like after a few years. I've made this experience, and it has been reported by others as well, e.g. https://mgualt.com/tealog/2020/03/24/ri ... d-storage/ However, if you open the bag regularly every couple of months, you're most likely be fine: I do that often with puerhs that are in my drinking rotation. Obviously, I cannot give you particular data when it is safe and when not.
If you use the ceramic crock add the Boveda pack on top your tea, you'll see how fast or slow it will take it to dry out.
+1 to this. Treating them similar to sheng puer has been working well for me. I think most fuzhuans can be neglected a bit more than shengpu without as dramatic a (negative) effect, but for prolonged storage they seem to benefit from heat and humidity (just not too much of it) and go flat in your typical "non-SEA/EA natural storage" environment.

Julie wrote:
Thu Aug 10, 2023 4:43 pm
  • I've read two opposing thoughts about fuzhuan: one storage thought says to raise the humidity, the other says keep humidity away so the bricks don't mold. What's a person to do?
I think "Where you stand depends on where you sit" when it comes to this. For those located in climates with a generally high relative humidity with sudden spikes, keeping the humidity at bay becomes most important (e.g. I know some Anhua heicha fans from Fujian that need to take care in the wet season). For most of the members of this forum, the oppositve problem (generally too low humidity and temperatures) is more pressing.

Plenty of sheng pu wrappers suggest you store the teas in a dry and cool place too, doesn't mean it's good advice. The proof is in the pudding. While the effect is not as dramatic as for pu, I generally prefer fuzhuans stored in Malaysia to those stored in e.g. Kunming.

As for crock storage I think that should be fine for the short term, though I'd opt for mylar myself if that's also an option.
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