How to determine hagi

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debunix
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Fri Jan 25, 2019 3:40 pm

This favorite piece of Hagi-ware by Yamane Seigan has coarser clay and a mix of nontraditional blue and sea-cucumber glazes, and no crackles, and I am excessively fond of it:

Image
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Baisao
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Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:25 pm

debunix wrote:
Fri Jan 25, 2019 3:40 pm
This favorite piece of Hagi-ware by Yamane Seigan has coarser clay and a mix of nontraditional blue and sea-cucumber glazes, and no crackles, and I am excessively fond of it:

Image
What a stunning piece!
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Baisao
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Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:46 pm

@steanze, thank you for that wealth of information! I took a look at the works of Miwa Kyusetsu XII and immediately knew they weren’t for me. Perhaps Liberace’s ghost finds them alluring. Masanao’s chawans were fascinating in both structure and glaze. There’s a sculptural boldness to them that’s contrasted by delicate glazes.

I think I get it now. It was so obvious that I managed to overlook it. There’s a highly generalized look to Hagi-yaki with specifics by era, no different than Tokoname-yaki, Yixing, etc. Hagi is a location with a heritage and each generation takes steps to innovate their art. This is why there’s no hard rule on what glazes can be used. Like other locations, the pottery from those areas will tend to have a certain look or quality, but these won’t necessarily be the same with every artist in that locality.

Cheers!
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debunix
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Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:50 pm

It has a near twin that lives at work that I like even better because it has a bit of clay showing through in the middle of the bowl. I feel very lucky to have gotten this pair.

Here is a much more rugged looking Hagi, from a TeaChat special offer, by Shibuya Eiichi

Image

Image

It is developing lovely crackles inside and out.

Despite the rugged looks, however, it is very thin and light and I am very careful in handling it. After one of my Eiichi pieces cracked from an impact in storage, and the very large sand-colored yunomi above met a different hard surface, I'm more aware than ever of how fragile it is.
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Mrs. Chip
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Sat Jan 26, 2019 10:00 am

debunix wrote:
Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:50 pm
It has a near twin that lives at work that I like even better because it has a bit of clay showing through in the middle of the bowl. I feel very lucky to have gotten this pair.

Here is a much more rugged looking Hagi, from a TeaChat special offer, by Shibuya Eiichi

Image

Image

It is developing lovely crackles inside and out.

Despite the rugged looks, however, it is very thin and light and I am very careful in handling it. After one of my Eiichi pieces cracked from an impact in storage, and the very large sand-colored yunomi above met a different hard surface, I'm more aware than ever of how fragile it is.
Beautiful Eiichi cup debunix, I need to get Chip to post some of our SO pieces, many are among my favorites.
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steanze
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Sat Jan 26, 2019 10:29 am

Baisao wrote:
Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:46 pm
steanze, thank you for that wealth of information! I took a look at the works of Miwa Kyusetsu XII and immediately knew they weren’t for me. Perhaps Liberace’s ghost finds them alluring. Masanao’s chawans were fascinating in both structure and glaze. There’s a sculptural boldness to them that’s contrasted by delicate glazes.

I think I get it now. It was so obvious that I managed to overlook it. There’s a highly generalized look to Hagi-yaki with specifics by era, no different than Tokoname-yaki, Yixing, etc. Hagi is a location with a heritage and each generation takes steps to innovate their art. This is why there’s no hard rule on what glazes can be used. Like other locations, the pottery from those areas will tend to have a certain look or quality, but these won’t necessarily be the same with every artist in that locality.

Cheers!
Glad it was helpful! Kyusetsu XII is also not my favorite, I personally prefer Kyusetsu X, although Kyusetsu XI is currently the most sought after/expensive. Exactly, the sculptural shape of Masanao's works is very appealing to me.
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Baisao
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Sat Jan 26, 2019 5:28 pm

debunix wrote:
Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:50 pm
It has a near twin that lives at work that I like even better because it has a bit of clay showing through in the middle of the bowl. I feel very lucky to have gotten this pair.

Here is a much more rugged looking Hagi, from a TeaChat special offer, by Shibuya Eiichi

Image

Image

It is developing lovely crackles inside and out.

Despite the rugged looks, however, it is very thin and light and I am very careful in handling it. After one of my Eiichi pieces cracked from an impact in storage, and the very large sand-colored yunomi above met a different hard surface, I'm more aware than ever of how fragile it is.
@debunix, you’ve mentioned breaking Hagi pieces several times. I’ve been drinking tea for 15 years and a ceramics/glass enthusiast for 30 years or more yet I’ve never broken a piece— not a single item. This includes drunkenly handling antique absinthe wares at parties in NOLA on rickety cafe tables, traveling with my pieces, drinking tea every day, and occasionally hoasting get togethers and classes. Are Hagi wares exceptionally fragile?
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Baisao
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Sat Jan 26, 2019 5:30 pm

Jo wrote:
Sat Jan 26, 2019 10:00 am
Beautiful Eiichi cup debunix, I need to get Chip to post some of our SO pieces, many are among my favorites.
Are these SOs a thing of the past or something worth revisiting again?
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Baisao
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Sat Jan 26, 2019 5:38 pm

steanze wrote:
Sat Jan 26, 2019 10:29 am
Glad it was helpful! Kyusetsu XII is also not my favorite, I personally prefer Kyusetsu X, although Kyusetsu XI is currently the most sought after/expensive. Exactly, the sculptural shape of Masanao's works is very appealing to me.
Very helpful, indeed! I was clearly missing the forest for the trees. I think you and I are generally inline with each other when it comes to aesthetics. I will say that of them all, I prefer the subtle humility and delicacy of the early chawan in the video. It’s quite amazing to see how Hagi-yaki evolved over time.
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Mrs. Chip
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Sat Jan 26, 2019 5:55 pm

Baisao wrote:
Sat Jan 26, 2019 5:30 pm
Jo wrote:
Sat Jan 26, 2019 10:00 am
Beautiful Eiichi cup debunix, I need to get Chip to post some of our SO pieces, many are among my favorites.
Are these SOs a thing of the past or something worth revisiting again?
Well, we shall see, but ultimately Chip will have to decide :mrgreen:
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Mrs. Chip
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Sat Jan 26, 2019 6:00 pm

Baisao, it was a very intensive proceess, taking many months to a year for these SOs to come to the many decisions needed for the completion of each piece.

Guess we would need to see if there is interest first.
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debunix
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Sat Jan 26, 2019 9:05 pm

Baisao wrote:
Sat Jan 26, 2019 5:28 pm
Are Hagi wares exceptionally fragile?
Some of them do seem more delicate than average--the loquat-glazed yunomi always felt rather delicate, and so does the Rock Hagi above, because some parts of the walls are rather thin, and I worry more about temperature shifts causing cracks with Hagi yaki than with porcelain or stoneware. But I've also broken teaware from Czechoslovakia, China, and the USA--often with the help of a cat. I'm a bit clumsy in general. When I started collecting teaware, I lived in a house with a tile kitchen--tiled floor, tiled counter surfaces, and a porcelain sink. Now I have formica counters, a steel sink, and wood floors, and more experience protecting delicate teawares, and I drink matcha, so I am ready to try again with a Biwa Hagi chawan, when the right one crosses my path.
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Baisao
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Sun Jan 27, 2019 1:21 am

debunix wrote:
Sat Jan 26, 2019 9:05 pm
Baisao wrote:
Sat Jan 26, 2019 5:28 pm
Are Hagi wares exceptionally fragile?
Some of them do seem more delicate than average--the loquat-glazed yunomi always felt rather delicate, and so does the Rock Hagi above, because some parts of the walls are rather thin, and I worry more about temperature shifts causing cracks with Hagi yaki than with porcelain or stoneware. But I've also broken teaware from Czechoslovakia, China, and the USA--often with the help of a cat. I'm a bit clumsy in general. When I started collecting teaware, I lived in a house with a tile kitchen--tiled floor, tiled counter surfaces, and a porcelain sink. Now I have formica counters, a steel sink, and wood floors, and more experience protecting delicate teawares, and I drink matcha, so I am ready to try again with a Biwa Hagi chawan, when the right one crosses my path.
This makes a lot more sense, especially the slick surfaces combined with hard flooring. I can also imagine what you’re describing with the thin walls and expansion/contraction with rapid temperature changes.
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Baisao
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Sun Jan 27, 2019 1:23 am

Jo wrote:
Sat Jan 26, 2019 6:00 pm
Baisao, it was a very intensive proceess, taking many months to a year for these SOs to come to the many decisions needed for the completion of each piece.

Guess we would need to see if there is interest first.
I didn’t realize that. It’s impressive that they happened at all. Well, I am interested should he decide to have another.
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debunix
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Sun Jan 27, 2019 9:31 pm

These are some Yamane Seigan pieces from two different TeaChat Hagi offerings, and without feeling clumsy, they have a wonderfully sturdy solidity to them, that adds to their appealing shapes and colors. I feel very relaxed using these:

Image
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