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Re: New Shigaraki teapot

Posted: Thu May 28, 2020 2:29 pm
by pantry
Victoria wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 5:11 pm
Baking soda on the other hand can be ingested and used as a baking ingredient. If you are concerned with abrasion soaking baking soda in simmering water with a protective cloth can help to dislodge old impacted organic materials. Just make sure to follow with a diluted vinegar wash to balance pH and remove all baking soda.

* partially quoting myself here from step D. in Cleaning: Awakening & Resetting Unglazed Ceramics / Yixing
I didn't know about the pH balancing step! I recently cleaned the inside of some of my pots with baking soda, and have found the resulting water made from these pots tasted a little off. I'm afraid of using vinegar though because of its strong smell. Do you think a drop of lime juice would work? Would the pH balance back on its own?

Re: New Shigaraki teapot

Posted: Thu May 28, 2020 2:41 pm
by Victoria
pantry wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 2:29 pm
Victoria wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 5:11 pm
Baking soda on the other hand can be ingested and used as a baking ingredient. If you are concerned with abrasion soaking baking soda in simmering water with a protective cloth can help to dislodge old impacted organic materials. Just make sure to follow with a diluted vinegar wash to balance pH and remove all baking soda.

* partially quoting myself here from step D. in Cleaning: Awakening & Resetting Unglazed Ceramics / Yixing
I didn't know about the pH balancing step! I recently cleaned the inside of some of my pots with baking soda, and have found the resulting water made from these pots tasted a little off. I'm afraid of using vinegar though because of its strong smell. Do you think a drop of lime juice would work? Would the pH balance back on its own?
I use 1/3 white vinegar in filtered water, let it soak +-15min., and rinse. Vinegar odor fully evaporates within a day or two, so no need to worry. I prefer white vinegar, over lime or lemon which could lead to mold if any organic particles get lodged in a hidden crevice.

Re: New Shigaraki teapot

Posted: Thu May 28, 2020 2:51 pm
by pantry
Victoria wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 2:41 pm
I use 1/3 white vinegar in filtered water, let it soak +-15min., and rinse. Vinegar odor fully evaporates within a day or two, so no need to worry. I prefer white vinegar, over lime or lemon which could lead to mold if any organic particles get lodged in a hidden crevice.
Thanks for the tips! I never thought of that (organic particles)! I shall try with the so-so zini pot first and see how it goes. Thanks!

Re: New Shigaraki teapot

Posted: Thu May 28, 2020 2:56 pm
by Victoria
pantry wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 2:51 pm
Victoria wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 2:41 pm
I use 1/3 white vinegar in filtered water, let it soak +-15min., and rinse. Vinegar odor fully evaporates within a day or two, so no need to worry. I prefer white vinegar, over lime or lemon which could lead to mold if any organic particles get lodged in a hidden crevice.
Thanks for the tips! I never thought of that (organic particles)! I shall try with the so-so zini pot first and see how it goes. Thanks!
Forgot to add, if you use very hot filtered water with 1/3 vinegar added, odor will dissipate/evaporate more quickly.

Re: New Shigaraki teapot

Posted: Fri May 29, 2020 4:16 am
by Tor
pantry wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 2:29 pm

I didn't know about the pH balancing step! I recently cleaned the inside of some of my pots with baking soda, and have found the resulting water made from these pots tasted a little off. I'm afraid of using vinegar though because of its strong smell. Do you think a drop of lime juice would work? Would the pH balance back on its own?
You can use citric acid, which is odorless.

I didn’t use acid after sodium percarbonate unless I wanted to also remove any lime scale. I just immersed the whole teapot in a large bowl of filtered water overnight, and never noticed any strange flavor.

My Shigaraki smelled like mozzarella cheese after its first sencha brewing. I simmered it in filtered tap water for an hour, changed the water, and repeated 4-5 times. After that the tea came out very nicely.

Some people don’t like to simmer their teapot and just rinse it with hot water. I’ve tried both ways with many new teapots and found that 9 times out of 10 I prefer to simmer it.

Re: New Shigaraki teapot

Posted: Fri May 29, 2020 6:14 pm
by faj
I left the pot with water in it last night too, and this morning tasted the water. I had a hint of a clay taste (nothing foul), no color I could discern. I will infuse tea with it tomorrow.

As an aside, I measured a quite significant drop in weight, happening over maybe 10 hours of drying. After rinsing with boiling water and waiting for water on the surface to evaporate until it seems dry, the teapot still holds about 4% of its weight in water. I never tested this with any other teapot, but I would think the amount would be negligible in most cases. This clay is quite spongy!

I noticed small droplets coming out on the outside every time the teapot had soaked in water and I then poured hot water in. It is water being pushed out due to pressure.

This teapot is quite interesting. One the one hand the clay is rough in appearance, but on the other hand the shape is very smooth and rounded. It fits wonderfully in the hand, the lid fit is flawless, and its tendency to drip from the lid and spout is minimal despite the clay being porous and rough. It seems so well made and balanced that it can afford the luxury of being almost too simple without becoming uninteresting. I hope I find good tea pairings for it, as this teapot is begging to be used.

Re: New Shigaraki teapot

Posted: Fri May 29, 2020 6:47 pm
by Victoria
faj wrote:
Fri May 29, 2020 6:14 pm
This teapot is quite interesting. One the one hand the clay is rough in appearance, but on the other hand the shape is very smooth and rounded. It fits wonderfully in the hand, the lid fit is flawless, and its tendency to drip from the lid and spout is minimal despite the clay being porous and rough. It seems so well made and balanced that it can afford the luxury of being almost too simple without becoming uninteresting. I hope I find good tea pairings for it, as this teapot is begging to be used.
Beautifully expressed @faj. I also find Tachi Masaki’s sense of balance and proportion hits a harmonic note. Since it is porous it can make a tea that is a little thin slightly thicker. I pair mine, which I got from @Muadeeb (kyusu on the right side of 1st OP) with sencha and sometimes gyokuro. It’s size at 120ml and porosity works well with certain special Japanese teas. I could see getting a slightly larger one as well. What size is yours?

Re: New Shigaraki teapot

Posted: Fri May 29, 2020 7:52 pm
by faj
Victoria wrote:
Fri May 29, 2020 6:47 pm
I could see getting a slightly larger one as well. What size is yours?
120ml, like yours. I have purchased mostly teapots in the 100-120ml range to explore various clays with various teas. For preparing tea for myself, I like that size. I have a couple of bigger ones I have purchased from a fellow forum member which I use when making tea for two, but I see myself more actively seeking bigger bots if and when I find tea/clay combinations that my partner and I are likely to be enjoying on a regular basis.