Hagi

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rdl
Posts: 113
Joined: Tue Jan 02, 2018 3:43 am

Sun Aug 09, 2020 5:59 pm

Fuut wrote:
Thu Aug 06, 2020 1:59 pm
I can't follow at all those prices on the site. I see bowls priced $600,- i could buy elsewhere for less than 100,-.
Seigan has a large workshop, with several kilns and staff. Looking through his studio you will find pieces priced from low to high, depending on the degree of quality he determines that work to be.
I cannot judge why the various e-shops price his work the way they do, but I imagine in all fairness to these shops, they make the same price determination as Seigan himself does. That's to say, a $100 chawan is worth $100, while a $500 chawan is worth that much.
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debunix
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Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:27 am
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Sun Aug 09, 2020 6:22 pm

I've looked at a lot of his work from various sites and sources since I first became aware of him via those now-deleted TeaChat Hagi special offers. The pieces on the OniHagi site are clearly more sophisticated and striking, and I value them a lot higher than the inexpensive cups I purchased off the Hiroshima Gallery site. To be fair, the Hiroshima Gallery also offers some higher priced and much more striking works. But for what I was looking for--a few inexpensive cups to share at work--these 'from the master's shop' works will be perfect. And I'll finally get a chance to hold one of his 'ice split' glazes in my hand and get a better sense of whether I really want to invest in something like this:

Image
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debunix
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Fri Aug 14, 2020 10:09 am

New little Hagi by Eiichi Shibuya, from the Hiroshima Galley eBay store. I was smitten with the pillowy white glaze patterned against the dark clay. It has a subtle matte finish and feels a bit matte to the touch too.
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Bintuborg
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Jun 14, 2020 3:29 pm
Location: San Diego, Ca

Fri Aug 14, 2020 1:49 pm

I like!!
Abracadaver!
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2018 9:30 pm

Tue Aug 25, 2020 4:43 pm

rdl wrote:
Sun Aug 09, 2020 5:59 pm
Fuut wrote:
Thu Aug 06, 2020 1:59 pm
I can't follow at all those prices on the site. I see bowls priced $600,- i could buy elsewhere for less than 100,-.
Seigan has a large workshop, with several kilns and staff. Looking through his studio you will find pieces priced from low to high, depending on the degree of quality he determines that work to be.
I cannot judge why the various e-shops price his work the way they do, but I imagine in all fairness to these shops, they make the same price determination as Seigan himself does. That's to say, a $100 chawan is worth $100, while a $500 chawan is worth that much.
I would recommend being extremely cautious when purchasing from this vendor. I have seen a number of items in their shop originally for sale via Yahoo Auctions Japan be sold, then listed a couple of weeks later by this vendor at triple/quadruple the price. Obviously, an item is worth what someone is willing to pay so more power to them, but note that the prices you see are likely not representative of the normal market value of the item. Same for the incense-- a few things on their site are price at nearly 10x the actual price.

Full disclosure: I have purchased from this vendor before, and the last time was a huge mess. I'm not suggesting they are untrustworthy, just not very transparent and extremely unreliable. Caveat emptor.
Rarity
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2020 9:04 am

Mon Nov 09, 2020 1:16 am

I‘ve been under the assumption that when using hagi ware, if you use a pot or a cup for one particular type of tea then we need to stay with that particular tea as it will eventually stain the teaware and affect the taste for future teas. But lately i noticed pictures of people using the same hagiware for different tea types and i went to ask a vendor about it. The vendor said its possible and that the stains don't affect the taste of the tea. Is this true? I was fairly sold on that till the vendor told me i could even put hot chocolate or soda on it which i've been told is a big no no.

Also how long do we soak hagi ware before using them on a daily basis? And is it hot, lukewarm or cold water? Or do we just rise it with hot water afterwards?
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debunix
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Tue Nov 10, 2020 11:14 am

Please see discussion in this recent thread regarding stains and what we put in Hagi....

Regarding soaks etc, I soak Hagi before a first use in warm water; but I do not give them a daily soak (but maybe I should, I've lost a couple of lovely pieces to cracks, sad lessions all). I use my most delicate wares--not all and not only Hagi, as this Iga-yaki falls into the same category of very thin-walled coarse clays--mostly with Japanese teas that start out with cooler infusions and gradually increase temps with later infusions right up to boiling, so I am not shocking the cups with boiling water from room temperature. And if they really cool down between infusions because of some delay--like perfect light in the garden prompting a photo excursion--I splash hot water over them inside and out to rinse and warm before filling with the next infusion.
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rdl
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Wed Nov 11, 2020 10:40 am

Rarity wrote:
Mon Nov 09, 2020 1:16 am
Also how long do we soak hagi ware before using them on a daily basis? And is it hot, lukewarm or cold water? Or do we just rise it with hot water afterwards?
In my own use of Hagiyaki I have only followed the instructions of soaking a new piece before the first use. After, I have only rinsed the cup, bowl, in hot water to clean it, let it dry, and take it later as is to use again. Even in Hagi, as well in a potter's studio, I have not seen a pre-rinse done before serving tea. Just my knowledge and observation. I don't want to cause any unfortunate breakage by suggesting this must be the only procedure. It's necessary to add that I don't typically pour close to boiling hot tea in my Hagiyaki.
Rarity
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2020 9:04 am

Wed Nov 11, 2020 6:57 pm

Thank you for your suggestions!
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