Yixing

Teachronicles
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 12:57 pm

Mark-S wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 12:47 pm
Youzi

Sorry, that I misunderstood you.

I won't pour tea over my pots, because I really don't like these stains you can see on the pots from teachat. They are ugly and maybe even unhealthy.
Youzi wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 12:25 pm
Btw, you can just rinse the pot with hot water after you put the lid on, then you avoid uneven stain.
Thanks, I am already doing this, so maybe these stains are from minerals in my water.
I'm not sure how that person (in the link you posted) got those stains from just a few weeks of use. You can pour the rinse on your pot and ime, it does not end up looking like that. I agree, I do not like how that looks, to each their own of course, but it just looks dirty to me. Pouring the rinse on my pots has not resulted in my pots looking like that, even pre wiping with a cloth and pre using a brush, they looked more like your pot, with just some light staining around the opening.
Mark-S
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 1:11 pm

Teachronicles wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 12:57 pm
You can pour the rinse on your pot and ime, it does not end up looking like that.
That's good to know. Maybe if it takes too long with one of my other pots to develop a patina (especially the ZiNi pots) I'll try this. With the 40ml pot I did not need to do this. On the photo the pot looks a bit more shiny than in reality, but you can already see a patina developing.

This is off-topic of course but how did you remove the smell of your tea brush? Or didn't it have a smell?
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Balthazar
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 1:11 pm

Mark-S wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 12:47 pm
I won't pour tea over my pots, because I really don't like these stains you can see on the pots from teachat. They are (1) ugly and (2) maybe even unhealthy.
(1) No
(2) What?

Subjectivity strikes again :P

Here's a shot of today's workhorse. I know, I know, she's a real beauty :)

Image
Mark-S
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 1:25 pm

@Balthazar

1) Beauty really is in the eye of the beholder. Hahaha ;)

2) I don't know for sure, but I have read in some blog that many Chinese would clean their Yixing pots regularly (even from the inside), because they fear that this accumulated gunk could be unhealthy. I am not talking about the patina just the stains. Maybe @Bok or some other user with more knowledge could answer this.
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Balthazar
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 1:30 pm

Mark-S wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 1:25 pm
2) I don't know for sure, but I have read in some blog that many Chinese would clean their Yixing pots regularly (even from the inside), because they fear that this accumulated gunk could be unhealthy. I am not talking about the patina just the stains. Maybe Bok or some other user with more knowledge could answer this.
But that would be the inside of the pot, no? Even if one believes mineral deposits or tea stains could be unhealthy, unless you're in the habit of licking your pot I fail to see how having them on the outside of your pot could harm you.
Mark-S
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 1:34 pm

Balthazar wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 1:30 pm
But that would be the inside of the pot, no? Even if one believes mineral deposits or tea stains could be unhealthy, unless you're in the habit of licking your pot I fail to see how having them on the outside of your pot could harm you.
Yeah, personally, I don't think that this is unhealthy. Only if there's mold on the outside. :lol: I just don't do this because it looks unesthetic to me.
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Youzi
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 2:50 pm

Mark-S wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 1:25 pm

2) I don't know for sure, but I have read in some blog that many Chinese would clean their Yixing pots regularly (even from the inside), because they fear that this accumulated gunk could be unhealthy. I am not talking about the patina just the stains. Maybe Bok or some other user with more knowledge could answer this.
They clean it because it's ugly and just Commons sense to take care of your expensive and artful teapots. (yixing culture, as far as I know)
Mark-S
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 3:10 pm

Youzi wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 2:50 pm
They clean it because it's ugly and just Commons sense to take care of your expensive and artful teapots. (yixing culture, as far as I know)
Do you clean your pots on the inside with something different than water?
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Youzi
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 3:15 pm

Mark-S wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 3:10 pm
Youzi wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 2:50 pm
They clean it because it's ugly and just Commons sense to take care of your expensive and artful teapots. (yixing culture, as far as I know)
Do you clean your pots on the inside with something different than water?
No, because I use soft water and clean as soon as possible, when I can, so my pot's doesn't get stained. I also dry the droplets on my pot after putting on the lid and rinsing. So my recent pots a squeaky clean. :D
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Balthazar
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 3:17 pm

@Youzi, @Mark-S I think that's the majority opinion, yes.

Not going to stop me from relying on a more taoist understanding of 经年累月 though :lol:

(Although I'm not sure I would follow the same approach with a valuable antique. Probably wouldn't.)
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Youzi
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 3:22 pm

Balthazar wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 3:17 pm
Youzi, Mark-S I think that's the majority opinion, yes.

Not going to stop me from relying on a more taoist understanding of 经年累月 though :lol:

(Although I'm not sure I would follow the same approach with a valuable antique. Probably wouldn't.)
Oh, the teapot certainly changes and develops a nice even patina though, so the two is not tied together.
Mark-S
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 3:24 pm

@Youzi

Okay, thank you :D I'm not that orderly so my pots have some stains on the inside/outside, but for now I only rinse them with water and let them air-dry.

@Balthazar

With an antique I would also be even more careful and would try to avoid any stains. :)
Last edited by Mark-S on Sun Jun 28, 2020 3:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Balthazar
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 3:29 pm

@Youzi Yeah, that's what I meant by the "taoist interpretation", i.e. not wasting any effort in avoiding "ugly stains" but rather letting nature run it's course. As opposed to the classical gentleman/scholar's careful act of continuous maintenance. But I'm grasping at straws here, lol, it's more of an excuse to be lazy than anything else in my case.
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Youzi
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Sun Jun 28, 2020 4:14 pm

Balthazar wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 3:29 pm
Youzi Yeah, that's what I meant by the "taoist interpretation", i.e. not wasting any effort in avoiding "ugly stains" but rather letting nature run it's course. As opposed to the classical gentleman/scholar's careful act of continuous maintenance. But I'm grasping at straws here, lol, it's more of an excuse to be lazy than anything else in my case.
Seems like the Good old fight between Ruism and Taoism :D
Confucius and Laozi never really were on the same page. :D
Hmm
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Mon Jun 29, 2020 2:23 pm

Actually I think Confucianism and Taoism did somewhat converge into a syncretistic philosophy during the Han dynasty. Both original philosophies were I think realist in outlook, that applied the many similar categorical concepts, often looking for the same end result (order), just some differences on how to get there. That said, I think Confucianism was much more focus on order within the world of man, while Taoism was more focused on the general world of nature and how man works within that ordered nature.
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