Yixing

Teachronicles
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Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:02 pm

TeaTotaling wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 12:38 pm
Bok, and anyone else with experience. Does LQ/ER clay take time to awaken, before it really shines, as opposed to aged clay used for making modern pots. Bok, I know you mentioned in the other thread that 60's Hongni took a little time to come into it's own again. Linear thinking would have me to believe LQ/ER might take even more time before the true performance of the clay is revealed. Would this be mostly true?

Greatly appreciate everyone's valuable insight, it has been incredibly helpful thus far!
In my limited experience with my recent antique pot acquisition, it did take a few, maybe 2-4 sessions for it to brew well. Please be very careful to preheat your pots before using, as mine developed a hairline from just one use not doing so. Best wishes.
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steanze
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Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:03 pm

TeaTotaling wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 12:38 pm
Bok, and anyone else with experience. Does LQ/ER clay take time to awaken, before it really shines, as opposed to aged clay used for making modern pots. Bok, I know you mentioned in the other thread that 60's Hongni took a little time to come into it's own again.
Hi! What do you mean by "awaken"? Have an effect on tea? If that is what you mean, LQER pots have effect on tea from the beginning.
You do want to go easy on an old pot that has not been used for a long time, and pre-warm it gradually before dumping boiling water in it. Otherwise it might crack.
TeaTotaling wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 12:38 pm
LQ/ER might take even more time before the true performance of the clay is revealed. Would this be mostly true?
No, that's not true.
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TeaTotaling
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Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:34 pm

@gradiva The happy family, minus 3, that will be joining soon.
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TeaTotaling
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Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:36 pm

@Teachronicles Thank you! I am very careful to preheat all of my teapots, I don't like to cut corners, especially getting acquainted to the older pots.
Teachronicles
Posts: 408
Joined: Tue Dec 12, 2017 1:13 am
Location: SF Bay Area, CA

Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:50 pm

TeaTotaling wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:36 pm
Teachronicles Thank you! I am very careful to preheat all of my teapots, I don't like to cut corners, especially getting acquainted to the older pots.
You might wanna ask zisha art gallery of they've been "woken up." If not, I will soak them in room temp water overnight to saturate the clay, before then slowly bringing up to boiling temp with progressively hotter water.
Mark-S
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Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:50 pm

steanze wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:03 pm
You do want to go easy on an old pot that has not been used for a long time, and pre-warm it gradually before dumping boiling water in it. Otherwise it might crack.
Is this true for every old pot or only Zhuni pots? And if you have used it for a while do you still need to be this careful?
DailyTX
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Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:56 pm

Teachronicles wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:02 pm
TeaTotaling wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 12:38 pm
Bok, and anyone else with experience. Does LQ/ER clay take time to awaken, before it really shines, as opposed to aged clay used for making modern pots. Bok, I know you mentioned in the other thread that 60's Hongni took a little time to come into it's own again. Linear thinking would have me to believe LQ/ER might take even more time before the true performance of the clay is revealed. Would this be mostly true?

Greatly appreciate everyone's valuable insight, it has been incredibly helpful thus far!
In my limited experience with my recent antique pot acquisition, it did take a few, maybe 2-4 sessions for it to brew well. Please be very careful to preheat your pots before using, as mine developed a hairline from just one use not doing so. Best wishes.
@Teachronicles
Sounds painful to see a pot developing hairline. I had a similar situation, I wonder if you are still using that pot? If you are, has the hairline grew? I am a bit hesitant to use the pot due to worrying the hairline may expand.
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steanze
Posts: 636
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Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:56 pm

Mark-S wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:50 pm
steanze wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:03 pm
You do want to go easy on an old pot that has not been used for a long time, and pre-warm it gradually before dumping boiling water in it. Otherwise it might crack.
Is this true for every old pot or only Zhuni pots? And if you have used it for a while do you still need to be this careful?
It is true for all old pots, but especially for zhuni. For zhuni, you always need to be this careful. For other pots, it is not always necessary, but if you don't prewarm you are doing it at your own risk. It is especially important when the pot or the room is cold.
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steanze
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Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:56 pm

DailyTX wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:56 pm

Sounds painful to see a pot developing hairline. I had a similar situation, I wonder if you are still using that pot? If you are, has the hairline grew? I am a bit hesitant to use the pot due to worrying the hairline may expand.
I recommend kintsugi before using the pot more
Mark-S
Posts: 574
Joined: Sun Nov 24, 2019 6:05 pm
Location: Germany

Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:59 pm

steanze wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:56 pm
I recommend kintsugi before using the pot more
You can use kintsugi to fix hairline cracks?
Teachronicles
Posts: 408
Joined: Tue Dec 12, 2017 1:13 am
Location: SF Bay Area, CA

Tue Jun 02, 2020 2:00 pm

DailyTX wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:56 pm
Teachronicles wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:02 pm
TeaTotaling wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 12:38 pm
Bok, and anyone else with experience. Does LQ/ER clay take time to awaken, before it really shines, as opposed to aged clay used for making modern pots. Bok, I know you mentioned in the other thread that 60's Hongni took a little time to come into it's own again. Linear thinking would have me to believe LQ/ER might take even more time before the true performance of the clay is revealed. Would this be mostly true?

Greatly appreciate everyone's valuable insight, it has been incredibly helpful thus far!
In my limited experience with my recent antique pot acquisition, it did take a few, maybe 2-4 sessions for it to brew well. Please be very careful to preheat your pots before using, as mine developed a hairline from just one use not doing so. Best wishes.
Teachronicles
Sounds painful to see a pot developing hairline. I had a similar situation, I wonder if you are still using that pot? If you are, has the hairline grew? I am a bit hesitant to use the pot due to worrying the hairline may expand.
I'm getting it repaired/reinforced with metal staples right now.
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TeaTotaling
Posts: 380
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Location: Ohio

Tue Jun 02, 2020 2:00 pm

steanze wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:03 pm
TeaTotaling wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 12:38 pm
Bok, and anyone else with experience. Does LQ/ER clay take time to awaken, before it really shines, as opposed to aged clay used for making modern pots. Bok, I know you mentioned in the other thread that 60's Hongni took a little time to come into it's own again.
Hi! What do you mean by "awaken"? Have an effect on tea? If that is what you mean, LQER pots have effect on tea from the beginning.
You do want to go easy on an old pot that has not been used for a long time, and pre-warm it gradually before dumping boiling water in it. Otherwise it might crack.
TeaTotaling wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 12:38 pm
LQ/ER might take even more time before the true performance of the clay is revealed. Would this be mostly true?
No, that's not true.
@steanze Thank you! I am meaning, do you know it's true potential right out of the gates, or does it take time to acclimate. I wasn't sure if the age, and how long the pot has been lying dormant, made any difference up front. For instance in my above picture, the Lao Zini pot, second from the top, currently has the most profound affect on plain, boiled water, compared to the others. I know Zini tends to be more porous, but I currently notice a distinct difference between the modern Zini I mentioned, and the LQ/ER Zini, with respect to noticeable affect. Understanding the Zhuni can act more like porcelain, and the Hongni being less pronounced than Zini overall. I even notice the aforementioned Zini currently muting more than the pictured Duanni.

I guess, many factors, as you have mentioned before, all work together to play a defining role. Like clay purity, blending, craftsmanship, studio, and firing, among others.

I am very careful to ease these old pots into use. Definitely not hitting it with any hot water right out of the gates. Thanks for the word of caution, better not to learn the hard way, but rather the smart way.

It's been fun diving in, experimenting, and testing the waters thus far. I am excited to grow these pots over time!
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TeaTotaling
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Tue Jun 02, 2020 2:10 pm

Teachronicles wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:50 pm
TeaTotaling wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:36 pm
Teachronicles Thank you! I am very careful to preheat all of my teapots, I don't like to cut corners, especially getting acquainted to the older pots.
You might wanna ask zisha art gallery of they've been "woken up." If not, I will soak them in room temp water overnight to saturate the clay, before then slowly bringing up to boiling temp with progressively hotter water.
I certainly did, among the laundry list of other questions I asked!

I told them my current approach, and Mr. Tan was very casual about it. Just recommending warming them as I already do, before pouring boiling water into them. As it was put to me, "It will be fine". I definitely take a much more nurturing, and tender application. Gradually warming the pot with water from the faucet, then proceeding to add a little more heat gradually. Once it warms up, I let it sit for some time with hotter water, before finally using it. Tea time is no time to rush, in my opinion.
gradiva
Posts: 118
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Tue Jun 02, 2020 2:48 pm

TeaTotaling wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:34 pm
gradiva The happy family, minus 3, that will be joining soon.
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Wow! So cool! Looking forward to meeting the other three soon!
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Victoria
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Tue Jun 02, 2020 5:07 pm

Mark-S wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:59 pm
steanze wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:56 pm
I recommend kintsugi before using the pot more
You can use kintsugi to fix hairline cracks?
I have also developed a very fine hairline crack (from rim to mid body) on an old pot that is very special and that I only used a few times. Bummed. Staring at it an wondering how to proceed :(
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