Gaiwan

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klepto
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Sun Oct 18, 2020 6:14 pm

LeoFox wrote:
Sun Oct 18, 2020 2:45 pm
klepto wrote:
Sun Oct 18, 2020 12:53 pm
Teaswelike make a really good gaiwan, and my only complaint is when I death grip it the edge digs into my hand. It would be very hard to burn yourself with their gaiwan.
How does it compare to your little horseshoe from mud and leaves?
The TWL gaiwan has flared out edges so that they are not affected by the temps of the gaiwan itself. There is no saucer with this gaiwan and the lid makes it easier to set the right angle for pouring. It is almost an easy gaiwan. My gaiwan from M&L, the saucer has a hole in it so the bowl stays inside so you can easily grip the saucer and put your thumb on the top of the lid of the gaiwan for easy pouring.There are a lot of gaiwans made poorly and the saucer doesn't fit properly. Both are great gaiwans, it just depends on how you use it.

M&L Gaiwan:
s714233318180191521_p381_i18_w2560.jpeg
s714233318180191521_p381_i18_w2560.jpeg (150.33 KiB) Viewed 402 times
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LeoFox
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Sun Oct 18, 2020 6:16 pm

klepto wrote:
Sun Oct 18, 2020 6:14 pm
LeoFox wrote:
Sun Oct 18, 2020 2:45 pm
klepto wrote:
Sun Oct 18, 2020 12:53 pm
Teaswelike make a really good gaiwan, and my only complaint is when I death grip it the edge digs into my hand. It would be very hard to burn yourself with their gaiwan.
How does it compare to you up little horseshoe from mud and leaves?
The TWL gaiwan has flared out edges so that they are not affected by the temps of the gaiwan itself. There is no saucer with this gaiwan and the lid makes it easier to set the right angle for pouring. It is almost an easy gaiwan. My gaiwan from M&L, the saucer has a hole in it so the bowl stays inside so you can easily grip the saucer and put your thumb on the top of the lid of the gaiwan for easy pouring.There are a lot of gaiwans made poorly and the saucer doesn't fit properly. Both are great gaiwans, it just depends on how you use it.

M&L Gaiwan:
Image
Thanks! I think i will wait for twl to restock.
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LeoFox
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Thu Nov 19, 2020 9:12 am

Finally got my hands on the teas we like thin walled flared gaiwan!

It is thin and elegant as advertised. Also easy to use - tried it a few times with boiling water with no finger burn issue at all. For the price, this is great!

As a test, I brewed a chinese green that i typically brew in thick walled wide mouthed open kyusu from arita. In the kyusu, the infusion becomes yellowish if i go above 72 C. But with the gaiwan, following same leaf to water ratio and infusion time, the infusion is green even with boiling water. The taste is also more grassy and mineraly but much less buttery. I finally see now how this is the proper brewing vessel for chinese greens that need 80C or above temperature.

An interesting feature of the gaiwan is that it doesn't tip over! It has been designed so that it stands right back up even if you set it down on its side! I'm not sure if this is a common design feature of gaiwans, but it's probably mainly due to the flaring.



Now to nitpick, i noticed that at all edges, the unglazed areas are a bit sandy. My experience is that this means the clay behind the glaze is a bit lower quality, possibly fired at lower temperatures and may stain relatively easily. But for this price, i don't care. I am wondering though if i buy a more expensive gw from m&l, the unglazed edges would be more smooth and hard.

Edit: after a few more uses and cleanings, i noticed that the roughness has largely disappeared, and also there has been no staining issues. So whatever sandiness i felt there before must have somehow washed away.
Last edited by LeoFox on Sat Nov 21, 2020 1:01 pm, edited 7 times in total.
DailyTX
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Thu Nov 19, 2020 12:50 pm

I also own a TWL gaiwan, it has been great using it for TieGuanYin. I do hope they could make a bigger size so the leaves wouldn’t be so packed. As for M&L, I don’t have any gaiwan from them. General speaking, the cost of high end gaiwan is from the art/decor, craftsmanship of the gaiwan, successful rate, and not so much about the clay
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LeoFox
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Thu Nov 19, 2020 1:17 pm

DailyTX wrote:
Thu Nov 19, 2020 12:50 pm
I also own a TWL gaiwan, it has been great using it for TieGuanYin. I do hope they could make a bigger size so the leaves wouldn’t be so packed. As for M&L, I don’t have any gaiwan from them. General speaking, the cost of high end gaiwan is from the art/decor, craftsmanship of the gaiwan, successful rate, and not so much about the clay
In that case I am even more pleased with this purchase. Thanks for sharing your experience.
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klepto
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Thu Nov 19, 2020 6:28 pm

LeoFox wrote:
Thu Nov 19, 2020 9:12 am
Finally got my hands on the teas we like thin walled flared gaiwan!

Now to nitpick, i noticed that at all edges, the unglazed areas are a bit sandy. My experience is that this means the clay behind the glaze is a bit lower quality, possibly fired at lower temperatures and may stain relatively easily.
Yes I have noticed the roughness when wiping it down with a cloth. I'm glad you found a good gaiwan, in the future buy another and hide it :D So when you break that one you have a backup :D.
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Bok
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Thu Nov 19, 2020 6:46 pm

DailyTX wrote:
Thu Nov 19, 2020 12:50 pm
I also own a TWL gaiwan, it has been great using it for TieGuanYin. I do hope they could make a bigger size so the leaves wouldn’t be so packed. As for M&L, I don’t have any gaiwan from them. General speaking, the cost of high end gaiwan is from the art/decor, craftsmanship of the gaiwan, successful rate, and not so much about the clay
Second that, one does not have to spend much to get a very good gaiwan.

If it’s too packed just use less leaves ;)
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Bok
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Thu Nov 19, 2020 7:19 pm

LeoFox wrote:
Thu Nov 19, 2020 9:12 am
at all edges, the unglazed areas are a bit sandy. My experience is that this means the clay behind the glaze is a bit lower quality
unglazed porcelain is always sandy, just means that the edge hasn't been glazed.
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LeoFox
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Thu Nov 19, 2020 8:08 pm

Bok wrote:
Thu Nov 19, 2020 7:19 pm
LeoFox wrote:
Thu Nov 19, 2020 9:12 am
at all edges, the unglazed areas are a bit sandy. My experience is that this means the clay behind the glaze is a bit lower quality
unglazed porcelain is always sandy, just means that the edge hasn't been glazed.
Thats not always true. I have pieces of European made and japanese porcelain where the unglazed area is not sandy, but relatively smooth. They also don't stain or get dirty in a way that's not easily cleanable. In contrast, the sandy unglazed areas of crappier chinese porcelain get stained pretty quickly.
Another method is checking to see whether unglazed areas of the porcelain object become permanently stained (by tea or dirt, etc.) or whether they can be easily cleaned. True porcelain that is high fired will be impermeable and will not stain under the surface; making it easy to clean. Low fired porcelain and fake porcelain will pick up permanent staining in unglazed areas.
From https://www.mudandleaves.com/teatime-bl ... -porcelain
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