Yixing

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Bok
Posts: 1729
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Location: Taiwan

Wed Jul 03, 2019 9:30 pm

@DailyTX I think your a preliminary analysis is not bad, probably not far off the mark. It looks like a decent pot and also like it will become nice with usage.
DailyTX
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Tue Jul 09, 2019 11:21 am

Bok wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 9:30 pm
DailyTX I think your a preliminary analysis is not bad, probably not far off the mark. It looks like a decent pot and also like it will become nice with usage.
@Bok
Thank you for your feedback. I wonder if you have any idea on what might cause the spicy note/tingling reaction?
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Bok
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Tue Jul 09, 2019 7:06 pm

@DailyTX that I wouldn’t dare to guess without knowing the tea in particular.

Although I never had anything in a tea that I would describe as tingling! Mhh... only with that tea or with others as well?

If the pot is mostly new and unused, I think it wouldn’t hurt to let a bit of tea sit in it overnight with water. Just to get rid of any storage or other smells.
DailyTX
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Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:27 pm

Bok wrote:
Tue Jul 09, 2019 7:06 pm
DailyTX that I wouldn’t dare to guess without knowing the tea in particular.

Although I never had anything in a tea that I would describe as tingling! Mhh... only with that tea or with others as well?

If the pot is mostly new and unused, I think it wouldn’t hurt to let a bit of tea sit in it overnight with water. Just to get rid of any storage or other smells.
@Bok
The tingling sensation was just with drinking the hot water from the pot without tea. It's a good idea to let the pot season a little longer with tea for over night, and see what the tea taste like the follow morning. I am not complete sure if the pot was new, since the carving still had a coat of white stuff, I assumed it's not been use, and since I brewed Shu Pu erh, the carving turned to the pot color. It's nice to have someone to talk it out, innovative ideas are formed :)
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Bok
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Location: Taiwan

Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:55 pm

DailyTX wrote:
Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:27 pm
I am not complete sure if the pot was new, since the carving still had a coat of white stuff, I assumed it's not been use, and since I brewed Shu Pu erh, the carving turned to the pot color. It's nice to have someone to talk it out, innovative ideas are formed :)
White stuff could be a coat of wax, which was done sometimes in the past. in that case I would suggest to slow-boil the whole pot a bit in water to get it off. Wrapped in cloth, lid separate to avoid damage.
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Baisao
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Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:12 am

DailyTX wrote:
Tue Jul 09, 2019 11:21 am
I wonder if you have any idea on what might cause the spicy note/tingling reaction?
If you’re used to puerh then I am sure you could tell if the sensation was from camphor, since it is so common. If it’s not camphor then I have an alternative theory.

If someone used the pot for herbal medicine it’s possible they included Zanthoxylum piperitum, aka Sichuan pepper. It has a tingling/vibrating sensation that’s used in Chinese and Japanese cooking as well as Chinese herbal medicine. All parts of the plant have the chemical, sanshool, responsible for this sensation.

(I’m a fan of this plant and have native, Chinese, and Japanese Xanthoxylum spp.)

The flavor is lemony but the vibrating sensation is most notable.

I would consider soaking the pot in Everclear or Mohawk (ethyl alcohol used for drinking) to get the sanshool into solution.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydroxy_alpha_sanshool

It’s just an idea so take this idea with a jigger of salt.
DailyTX
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Fri Jul 12, 2019 10:20 pm

Bok wrote:
Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:55 pm
DailyTX wrote:
Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:27 pm
I am not complete sure if the pot was new, since the carving still had a coat of white stuff, I assumed it's not been use, and since I brewed Shu Pu erh, the carving turned to the pot color. It's nice to have someone to talk it out, innovative ideas are formed :)
White stuff could be a coat of wax, which was done sometimes in the past. in that case I would suggest to slow-boil the whole pot a bit in water to get it off. Wrapped in cloth, lid separate to avoid damage.
@Bok
The pot has boiled for hours. The tingling sensation has decrease somewhat, I am speculating that it may not be such good pot in terms of clay but well crafted for sure. The only concern I have is it may involve chemical in the process of making. I guess I'll add it to my ceramic collection until I know what I am dealing with. :?
Thank you for your input Bok
DailyTX
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Fri Jul 12, 2019 10:23 pm

Baisao wrote:
Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:12 am
DailyTX wrote:
Tue Jul 09, 2019 11:21 am
I wonder if you have any idea on what might cause the spicy note/tingling reaction?
If you’re used to puerh then I am sure you could tell if the sensation was from camphor, since it is so common. If it’s not camphor then I have an alternative theory.

If someone used the pot for herbal medicine it’s possible they included Zanthoxylum piperitum, aka Sichuan pepper. It has a tingling/vibrating sensation that’s used in Chinese and Japanese cooking as well as Chinese herbal medicine. All parts of the plant have the chemical, sanshool, responsible for this sensation.

(I’m a fan of this plant and have native, Chinese, and Japanese Xanthoxylum spp.)

The flavor is lemony but the vibrating sensation is most notable.

I would consider soaking the pot in Everclear or Mohawk (ethyl alcohol used for drinking) to get the sanshool into solution.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydroxy_alpha_sanshool

It’s just an idea so take this idea with a jigger of salt.
@Baisao
I love the sichuan pepper, I have sichuan food at least once a month. I don't think the pot was use at all, although it's from an ebay antique seller. Thank you for your feedback Baisao. It's one of those mysteries that I'll revisit later in life :)
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Bok
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Fri Jul 12, 2019 10:41 pm

@DailyTX you can almost be sure that there are additives in it. Looks like it’s 90s onwards pot. Clay has rarely been pure since the 80s.
lopin
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Sat Jul 13, 2019 4:34 am

Bok wrote:
Fri May 17, 2019 11:43 am
lopin what matters is the thickness of the walls, even the spout is medium thick in my book.

150 is way to big for Yancha, unless you are a big spender haha! Also with the thickness in mind, even less suitable.

Don’t know about the pour speed, but anything slower than 6 seconds is not ideal for Yancha.

Just try a variety of teas and see what works for you(more than once per tea to account for other parameters).
I played around with this pot a lot and it renders lapsang and other red teas beautifully. Also shu was nicely pronounced.
jessepat84
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Location: Finland

Sun Jul 21, 2019 11:49 am

Here’s an interesting pot... sold to me as Benshan Lv Ni, although I take such claims with a healthy dose of scepticism. While I have a couple of Duan Ni pots, this one is rather different in appearance and feel (the clay has more of an obvious yellow colour and feels more delicate). What do people think, could it be the real deal or something else? It does an excellent job with Chinese greens but somehow manages to have a strongly muting effect on many other teas. I’ve added a couple of photos with different lighting, one in evening sunlight and the other in shade.
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