2019 from Wuyi Origin?

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Bok
Posts: 2476
Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:55 am
Location: Taiwan

Tue Feb 11, 2020 1:41 am

carogust wrote:
Tue Feb 11, 2020 1:34 am
I do understand your point. I don't care that much to try the ultra ultra high end, just the normal high end. That will be good enough for me. I do think that the "low-end" of high end tea is available to the west, maybe with a bit of a premium. Maybe not the best but still good enough to get a good picture, even an approximate one.
And thanks for the vendor recommendation.
Seems a very reasonable expectation!
theredbaron
Posts: 109
Joined: Fri Oct 13, 2017 12:02 am
Location: Germany

Tue Feb 11, 2020 11:18 am

carogust wrote:
Mon Feb 10, 2020 11:56 pm
theredbaron I don't honestly believe that you need to be in asia to drink amazing yancha. You just need to know where to look! Sure the selection might not be as great and you'll have to pay a bit of a resale premium but it doesn't seem that bad to me. As I said, the EoT yancha is supposedly traditionally roasted, oxidized and aged for 2-3 years before being sold. The roasting style is very different in that than in other yancha I've had. Considering how their gui dong keng TLH is made from top top material (mature 40 yo bushes and in one of the best locations) and handmade I bet that it is REALLY the top stuff.
I have received a lot of my Yancha previously, since the late 1990's, when i still lived in Asia, from the same source EoT got theirs later on, and this is indeed more than decent Yancha. But EoT hasn't offered Yancha for quite some time.
But i also got better Yancha, on occasion. You will not get this outside of Asia, and in Asia also only through friends and connections, especially when you do not want to pay an arm and a leg for it.
To drink amazing yancha, i am afraid, you will have to be in Asia, and also get to know people in tea circles.

The reason is because really good Yancha is only grown in a very small area, and therefore a very limited product, and at the same time a very high demand in Asia itself. There won't be anything for a western market which to the largest part would not be able to appreciate it.
theredbaron
Posts: 109
Joined: Fri Oct 13, 2017 12:02 am
Location: Germany

Tue Feb 11, 2020 11:22 am

Bok wrote:
Mon Feb 10, 2020 8:27 pm

At least you can still find something similar to traditional Anxi TGY in Taiwan, where luckily no one would dare to process it green :mrgreen:

Interesting - while at the same time Anxi has almost completely changed to modern Taiwan style processing ;)
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Tillerman
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Posts: 351
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 4:58 pm
Location: Napa, CA
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Tue Feb 11, 2020 1:12 pm

theredbaron wrote:
Tue Feb 11, 2020 11:22 am
Bok wrote:
Mon Feb 10, 2020 8:27 pm

At least you can still find something similar to traditional Anxi TGY in Taiwan, where luckily no one would dare to process it green :mrgreen:

Interesting - while at the same time Anxi has almost completely changed to modern Taiwan style processing ;)
Muzha TGY is classic high (generally higher than most Anxi TGY ever was) charcoal roasted tea. BEWARE, however, for much of what is sold as Muzha TGY is in fact qing xin harvested in the Pinglin area and finished in a TGY style. This is because the TGY leaf generally commands the highest prices in Taiwan. Choose your vendor carefully if you desire the real thing.

As to modern Anxi TGY, it may be produced by following the Taiwanese gaoshan lead but the leaf does not have the richness of high mountain Taiwanese leaf and the resulting tea, in my opinion, is just weedy and thin.
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