What White Are You Drinking

Withered tea
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Victoria
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Thu Oct 25, 2018 12:58 pm

pedant wrote:
Wed Oct 24, 2018 11:58 pm
i've noticed white bingcha seems more and more popular. especially in gift shops.
i have had a few of them and was not impressed, but this one is pretty good.
.....
it is a lot like oriental beauty with a fresh medjool date note. i got the idea to grab one from the fridge after tasting the tea.
Wow, your Oribe glaze guinomi by Noritada Kimura looks awesome next to Sou Yamada’s blue kyusu, awesome pairing. I bet Sou will look great next to Akira’s guinomi as well. Sunday I had an aged white tea that also had notes of date and plum fruit and sweet flowers. That’s a big date :) .
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debunix
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Thu Oct 25, 2018 3:13 pm

I was admiring exactly that juxtaposition of colors, and thinking that the date gives shows how remarkably small and delicate the teapot is.
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Victoria
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Thu Oct 25, 2018 4:01 pm

The fruity floral white I had was a 2007 Shou Mei White Tea Cake, it also had a pleasant viscosity and was very smooth. It is also from Fuding area of Fujian province. Some of the leaves were really furry white.
luchayi
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Wed Nov 07, 2018 11:38 am

Bai hao Yin Zhen 2017 from Panxi. Not a top grade but it's funny to discover different tasting notes changing a little bit the temperature.


Ethan Kurland
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Wed Nov 07, 2018 1:52 pm

luchayi, I also enjoy playing with parameters sometimes. Often it is middle grade teas that are best for playing because preparing the very best ideally is so rewarding, one may not want to have an imperfect round of tea with a bad idea. Cheers
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Ouronok
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Wed Dec 19, 2018 3:56 am

I'm not really a fan of white teas but got the chance to try my first shoumei, White Crow, from Bitterleaf's Full House sampler pack. Using 4g/50ml at 100ºC gives me a more relaxed session than the usually experience of a Bai Mu Dan. It is perfect for boiling later and pushing it gives a warm sweetness that is not overpowering. Quite satisfied with it.
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teasecret
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Wed Jan 09, 2019 7:48 am

I'm drinking the Ding Ye "Lao Bai Cha" 2010 baimudan from Yunnan Sourcing. Really rich, with deep flower notes intact. Also really relaxing. Not sure if it's "7 years treasure" but it's certainly enjoyable.
cherrybomb7
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Mon Feb 04, 2019 6:40 pm

Has anyone tried the Old Arbor White from White2Tea. This is the most expensive white tea I have bought but is extremely up my alley. Unfortunately, I had a hard time the other day with getting leaves off and so only a few steeps were in a sweet spot of not bitter then just weak.
Hopefully next time I will have more notes but wanted to see other peoples experiences.
Teachronicles
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Wed Feb 06, 2019 1:27 am

cherrybomb7 wrote:
Mon Feb 04, 2019 6:40 pm
Has anyone tried the Old Arbor White from White2Tea. This is the most expensive white tea I have bought but is extremely up my alley. Unfortunately, I had a hard time the other day with getting leaves off and so only a few steeps were in a sweet spot of not bitter then just weak.
Hopefully next time I will have more notes but wanted to see other peoples experiences.
For breaking off chunks on tightly compressed cakes, technique is important. Make sure to firmly hold down the cake, with pickpointing away from your hand. For really tight stuff I look for a break in the leaf, ie between leafs. And go at a 15°-30° angle. Push hard into the cake, and go as far as you can with the pick, pry up slightly. I'll then go from that same spot or just to either side of it at a different angle to increase the size of the chunk I'm breaking off, do this till you have a reasonable sized chunk loosened up, using the same technique each time. The bigger the chunk the better as once it's off, it's thinner and it will be easier to break it up into smaller chunks. Using this technique I've easily been able to pry off chunks of cakes that others have struggled with. Very tightly pressed bricks and iron cakes are another story and imo not possible to break off pieces without lots of dust. Hope this helps and good luck!
cherrybomb7
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Thu Feb 07, 2019 4:26 pm

Teachronicles wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 1:27 am
cherrybomb7 wrote:
Mon Feb 04, 2019 6:40 pm
Has anyone tried the Old Arbor White from White2Tea. This is the most expensive white tea I have bought but is extremely up my alley. Unfortunately, I had a hard time the other day with getting leaves off and so only a few steeps were in a sweet spot of not bitter then just weak.
Hopefully next time I will have more notes but wanted to see other peoples experiences.
For breaking off chunks on tightly compressed cakes, technique is important. Make sure to firmly hold down the cake, with pickpointing away from your hand. For really tight stuff I look for a break in the leaf, ie between leafs. And go at a 15°-30° angle. Push hard into the cake, and go as far as you can with the pick, pry up slightly. I'll then go from that same spot or just to either side of it at a different angle to increase the size of the chunk I'm breaking off, do this till you have a reasonable sized chunk loosened up, using the same technique each time. The bigger the chunk the better as once it's off, it's thinner and it will be easier to break it up into smaller chunks. Using this technique I've easily been able to pry off chunks of cakes that others have struggled with. Very tightly pressed bricks and iron cakes are another story and imo not possible to break off pieces without lots of dust. Hope this helps and good luck!
Thank you for the tips! Tempted to go back to it soon.
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debunix
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Sun Mar 03, 2019 1:05 pm

An older pouch of Fu Ding Bai Hai Yin Zhen from Jing Tea Shop: floral, fruity, delicate, and somehow springlike and just right for a cool gray rainy morning....

Image

This silver needle stands out like the first blooms on the desert mallow

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against the background of gray-green foliage of the plants that are still in winter mode, or just starting to show the color of blooms to come

Image
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Elise
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Mon Mar 04, 2019 1:50 am

Pretty pictures, are they yours?
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debunix
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Mon Mar 04, 2019 8:42 pm

Yes, photos from my garden yesterday morning, between infusions and between rain showers.
luchayi
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Thu Mar 21, 2019 9:53 am

debunix wrote:
Mon Mar 04, 2019 8:42 pm
Yes, photos from my garden yesterday morning, between infusions and between rain showers.
Beautiful pictures!
luchayi
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Thu Mar 21, 2019 9:54 am

After almost 1 year from the harvest my favourite Fuding YinZhen is amazing!😍

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