Muzha TGY cultivar

Semi-oxidized tea
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ShuShu
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Thu Feb 01, 2018 8:42 pm

A vendor that specializes in Gaoshan offers a Muzha TGY (which is a long time favorite of mine) yet in the cultivar, he specifies "Jin Xuan".
I'm certainly not an expert but a little bit puzzled by this. Isn't TGY supposed to be the cultivar?
Also, does this mean that the flavor is going to be very different than the usual Muzha TGY?
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Bok
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Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:02 am

that is indeed a bit weird... Probably the vendour refer to the kind of processing? TGY is always roasted in Taiwan, the green variety of China does not exist. It has to be said, that names of teas in Taiwan do often not adhere to historical or scientific accuracy and are used with freedom.

Cultivars are rarely indicated here.
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ShuShu
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Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:22 am

edut
Last edited by ShuShu on Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
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ShuShu
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Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:24 am

ShuShu wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:22 am
Bok wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:02 am
that is indeed a bit weird... Probably the vendour refer to the kind of processing? TGY is always roasted in Taiwan, the green variety of China does not exist. It has to be said, that names of teas in Taiwan do often not adhere to historical or scientific accuracy and are used with freedom.

Cultivars are rarely indicated here.
Taste wise - a roasted Jin Xuan will be very different than a roasted TGY right?
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Bok
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Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:27 am

ShuShu wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:24 am
Taste wise - a roasted Jin Xuan will be very different than a roasted TGY right?
I would imagine so, but with the roasting maybe less noticeable, if the price is right it might be worth a shot to try.
Nowadays there are lots of novel teas coming out, the farmers are trying their best to offer new things to an increasingly difficult market.
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tealifehk
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Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:59 am

There is greener Muzha TGY out there. I love the stuff! Perhaps this was simply an error during listing by the vendor!
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ShuShu
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Fri Feb 02, 2018 9:11 am

tealifehk wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:59 am
There is greener Muzha TGY out there. I love the stuff! Perhaps this was simply an error during listing by the vendor!
I don't know... vendor says "This particular Iron Goddess of Muzha is actually made from Jin Xuan cultivar, that's unique to Taiwan." I just don't like asking and sound like a tea snob...
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tealifehk
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Fri Feb 02, 2018 9:20 am

ShuShu wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 9:11 am
tealifehk wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:59 am
There is greener Muzha TGY out there. I love the stuff! Perhaps this was simply an error during listing by the vendor!
I don't know... vendor says "This particular Iron Goddess of Muzha is actually made from Jin Xuan cultivar, that's unique to Taiwan." I just don't like asking and sound like a tea snob...
You're a paying customer! Just ask :)
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Brent D
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Sat Feb 03, 2018 10:43 am

tealifehk wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:59 am
There is greener Muzha TGY out there. I love the stuff! Perhaps this was simply an error during listing by the vendor!
Where are you getting unroasted muzha?
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tealifehk
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Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:45 am

Brent D wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 10:43 am
tealifehk wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:59 am
There is greener Muzha TGY out there. I love the stuff! Perhaps this was simply an error during listing by the vendor!
Where are you getting unroasted muzha?
From a family in Taipei. I didn't realize it was that uncommon. I will get some in later this year!
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ShuShu
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Sat Feb 03, 2018 6:27 pm

tealifehk wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:45 am
Brent D wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 10:43 am
tealifehk wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:59 am
There is greener Muzha TGY out there. I love the stuff! Perhaps this was simply an error during listing by the vendor!
Where are you getting unroasted muzha?


From a family in Taipei. I didn't realize it was that uncommon. I will get some in later this year!
I thought that the reason that TGY is roasted in Taiwan is b/c It doesn’t grow there as good as in Anxi. Perhaps the was the original reason....
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tealifehk
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Sat Feb 03, 2018 6:44 pm

ShuShu wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 6:27 pm
tealifehk wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:45 am
Brent D wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 10:43 am


Where are you getting unroasted muzha?


From a family in Taipei. I didn't realize it was that uncommon. I will get some in later this year!
I thought that the reason that TGY is roasted in Taiwan is b/c It doesn’t grow there as good as in Anxi. Perhaps the was the original reason....
IMO that reason would no longer be valid. Taiwanese TGY is pretty darn good!
oeroe
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Sun Feb 04, 2018 7:03 am

I think that in Taiwan TGY refers more to the processing style than actually the cultivar. By default wulong is ball-rolled and unroasted, tea with little roast might me called "Dongding-style wulong" even if it isn't from that area. Similarly quite oxidised and heavily roasted ball-rolled stuff might be called TGY, even if the cultivar isn't the same. I stayed a while in the East Coast of Taiwan, and that's the impression I got from the local shops.
Also I remember that in Linmaosen in Taipei the guy specifically mentioned that their highest grade TGY is made from the TGY cultivar, while usually they use newer cultivars.
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Bok
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Sun Feb 04, 2018 7:51 am

ShuShu wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 6:27 pm
tealifehk wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:45 am
Brent D wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 10:43 am


Where are you getting unroasted muzha?


From a family in Taipei. I didn't realize it was that uncommon. I will get some in later this year!
I thought that the reason that TGY is roasted in Taiwan is b/c It doesn’t grow there as good as in Anxi. Perhaps the was the original reason....
Originally, all TGY and Taiwan oolongs as well, were all roasted, the simple reason that it does not perish as fast as a greener version. The trend for green TGY and Taiwanese High Mountain teas also fall into that category, is a fairly recent one. Before the standard in Taiwan was always roasted. Improved production, processing and storage methods only made it possible.
wildisthewind
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Sun Feb 04, 2018 4:13 pm

ShuShu wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:24 am
ShuShu wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:22 am
Bok wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:02 am
that is indeed a bit weird... Probably the vendour refer to the kind of processing? TGY is always roasted in Taiwan, the green variety of China does not exist. It has to be said, that names of teas in Taiwan do often not adhere to historical or scientific accuracy and are used with freedom.

Cultivars are rarely indicated here.
Taste wise - a roasted Jin Xuan will be very different than a roasted TGY right?
True TGY varietal plants are less common, so more expensive. TGY-style teas are often made from non-TGY cultivars, though Si Ji Chun is more common than Jin Xuan because it's related to the original TGY plants genetically. They can still be great teas, but it's true they will taste very different than a real TGY, which roasted is very savory & nutty, with a slight sourness to it. Expect a fruitier tasting tea from Jin Xuan or Si Ji Chun TGY-style.
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