What Oolong Are You Drinking

Semi-oxidized tea
User avatar
Bok
Posts: 1040
Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:55 am

Sat Jul 28, 2018 10:25 pm

Victoria wrote:
Sat Jul 28, 2018 9:21 pm
Bok wrote:
Sat Jul 28, 2018 9:13 pm
Victoria wrote:
Sat Jul 28, 2018 4:05 pm
Bok how long were you in Europa?
For the longer part of my life, that’s where I grew up :)

Adapting the parameters helps, but the surrounding air is a mighty large factor to work around I fear! It did not bother me in the beginning of my discovery of Taiwanese teas when I was living there, due to lack of comparison and experience with those teas, now it is more obvious.

Not sure if I would even dare to let a Dongding open up in these conditions without some sort of pumidor!
Ah I see. Well I was asking how long, because I wondered how long the tea had a chance to settle down from its travels :D
You were traveling with greener un/lightly roasted DongDing? I agree though that higher oxidation, higher roasted teas do better when traveling.

p.s. So which teas did you travel with?
Haha, misunderstood your question :)

Well, actually I traveled with a bit of everything, as I do supply my family with tea (they can’t stand to drink anything else any longer, haha my fault). So Taiwanese greener Oolong, medium and heavy roast, blacks, even some Yancha. Teas rested at least a few days and I was also brewing tea which was already there and stored in cool condition as I would do in Taiwan as well.

All in all, I don’t think storage is the issue. Freshly opened pack smells the same on first look.

I did however find a forgotten pack somewhere that really turned into something which I sometimes find i. Taiwan in low elevation tea, although it was a Lishan.

The most striking change was a medium roasted tea where the brew tasted almost like an unroasted tea! Only when I pushed it, it showed hints of its supposed character.
User avatar
Psyck
Posts: 92
Joined: Wed Oct 25, 2017 4:41 am
Location: Bangalore, India

Sun Jul 29, 2018 3:40 am

From a quick surf of the net, it appears that higher humidity, lower temperature, and higher barometric pressure are preferred for better appreciation of aroma as less moisture/hotter weather/hypobaric conditions can impair olfactory sensitivity.
Ethan Kurland
Vendor
Posts: 212
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:01 am
Contact:

Mon Jul 30, 2018 10:10 pm

Psyck wrote:
Sun Jul 29, 2018 3:40 am
..... higher humidity, lower temperature, and higher barometric pressure are preferred for better appreciation of aroma as less moisture/hotter weather/hypobaric conditions can impair olfactory sensitivity.
"hypobaric" cool word. I think the conditions you describe come together on many days of Taiwan's winters & perhaps a fair amount of Boston's wintertime also. Unfortunately, if one is indoors & the heating systems are going strong, one's residence is full of dry air impairing "olfactory sensitivity". Coming home from a walk during winter rain or snowfalls, is a time tea tastes delicious & feels great going into a cold body with a wet nose.
User avatar
Psyck
Posts: 92
Joined: Wed Oct 25, 2017 4:41 am
Location: Bangalore, India

Tue Jul 31, 2018 5:28 am

Ethan Kurland wrote:
Mon Jul 30, 2018 10:10 pm
"hypobaric" cool word. ...
I was initially planning to be even cooler and throw in some hyperbaric and stuff too; however sanity prevailed & I phrased the sentence such that one could figure out what hypobaric meant without having to look it up.

Oolongs being among the most fragrant & aromatic of teas, it makes sense to enjoy them, at least the higher end ones, in more ideal conditions. As you mention the cool and humid conditions post rain are quite suitable (not before it rains though as it is low pressure that often causes rain).
Mitten5
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2018 12:26 pm

Wed Aug 01, 2018 9:16 am

I have two of Chen's mail order teas from last year's roasting today, my last session with both of these two! So sad! I have a Lishan Primitive Wild Forest in an unroasted (or lightly roasted) and a charcoal roast format. Probably 8ish g of each in ~120cc? Both are still very good, still very buttery, creamy and rich, and retain a lot of their attractive qualities. The unroasted has lost a lot of flavor since last year, and still contains a lot of vegetal qualities. The charcoal roasted is still very rich and vibrant feeling, much more active in the mouth. The vegetal qualities are less sweet-beany and more rich onion-soupy. Some of that is a stickier mouthfeel, this tea makes me want to chew. However, not too onion-soupy, like Floating Leaves Hehuan Shan from 2015, which made me feel like I was on a sickbed drinking onion/garlic broth. Both of these Lishan teas were a real treat. I never really ended up doing a direct comparison with the primitive wild lishan and the tea garden lishan, so maybe that will be the plan for this coming year's Chen order. The Lishan was by far my favorite tea this past year from both Floating Leaves and from Chen, so needless to say I will probably be in for more. I still have some of my 'bug bitten' from this year's Chen order, so I'm looking forward to finishing that in the next week or so.
User avatar
Victoria
Admin
Posts: 842
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2017 3:33 pm
Location: Santa Monica, CA
Contact:

Wed Aug 01, 2018 1:50 pm

Mitten5 wrote:
Wed Aug 01, 2018 9:16 am
I have two of Chen's mail order teas from last year's roasting today, my last session with both of these two! So sad! I have a Lishan Primitive Wild Forest in an unroasted (or lightly roasted) and a charcoal roast format. Probably 8ish g of each in ~120cc? Both are still very good, still very buttery, creamy and rich, and retain a lot of their attractive qualities. The unroasted has lost a lot of flavor since last year, and still contains a lot of vegetal qualities. The charcoal roasted is still very rich and vibrant feeling, much more active in the mouth. The vegetal qualities are less sweet-beany and more rich onion-soupy. Some of that is a stickier mouthfeel, this tea makes me want to chew. However, not too onion-soupy, like Floating Leaves Hehuan Shan from 2015, which made me feel like I was on a sickbed drinking onion/garlic broth. Both of these Lishan teas were a real treat. I never really ended up doing a direct comparison with the primitive wild lishan and the tea garden lishan, so maybe that will be the plan for this coming year's Chen order. The Lishan was by far my favorite tea this past year from both Floating Leaves and from Chen, so needless to say I will probably be in for more. I still have some of my 'bug bitten' from this year's Chen order, so I'm looking forward to finishing that in the next week or so.
I find his bug bitten is better 9months to a year later. Floating Leaves LiShan is perfectly buttery rich, as is T Company out of NYC but I don’t think they have it in stock, it’s called Pear Mountain at South Ridge. HY Chen’s LiShan Primitive Wild Forest is sooo delicious, and his roasted DaYuLing an experience worth repeating.
User avatar
Shine Magical
Posts: 285
Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2017 4:13 pm
Location: NYC

Sun Aug 05, 2018 11:16 am

@Bok, I recently bought a portable water heater and drank some sheng outside. Same yixing pot, even same Poland Spring water that I dragged to Central Park.

But the tea tasted so flat. I assumed it was due to the vessel I was heating the water in, a gas powered kettle used for hiking, that boils water in 1 minute. I assumed it was either the material of the new kettle or the speed at which the water boiled in it. But perhaps it was just a consequence of drinking tea in a different environment with different air (indoor vs outdoor, though in the same neighborhood).
Last edited by Shine Magical on Fri Aug 17, 2018 11:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
debunix
Posts: 353
Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:27 am

Sun Aug 05, 2018 11:33 am

Enjoying more teas from Morning Crane's 2018 Tea Buy Korea: today, Halmonicha from Jeon Yae Yeun. As a bahlyocha, it's closest to an oolong, so I put it here.

Last week I was overzealous in pulling out what I thought was a part of a dead annual flower, but it was a dead stalk on a perennial Mountain Mint. Errors like this, or things that need cutting back, are the main source of flowers for my tea table.

Image

I had some time to reflect on them while enjoying my fruity, tart, earthy, spicy bahlyocha.

Image
User avatar
Bok
Posts: 1040
Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:55 am

Sun Aug 05, 2018 8:10 pm

debunix wrote:
Sun Aug 05, 2018 11:33 am
Enjoying more teas from Morning Crane's 2018 Tea Buy Korea: today, Halmonicha from Jeon Yae Yeun. As a bahlyocha, it's closest to an oolong, so I put it here.

Last week I was overzealous in pulling out what I thought was a part of a dead annual flower, but it was a dead stalk on a perennial Mountain Mint. Errors like this, or things that need cutting back, are the main source of flowers for my tea table.

Image

I had some time to reflect on them while enjoying my fruity, tart, earthy, spicy bahlyocha.

Image
beautiful pictures!
User avatar
Victoria
Admin
Posts: 842
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2017 3:33 pm
Location: Santa Monica, CA
Contact:

Sun Aug 05, 2018 8:22 pm

Yes gorgeous, lush. Nice to see Debunix posting again :) .
User avatar
debunix
Posts: 353
Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:27 am

Tue Aug 14, 2018 8:43 am

Opened up a new package of FouShouShan from Ethan. I've been drinking a LOT of the milk oolong from Bird Pick Tea because it is absolutely splendid in my cool brewing for hot days, and I haven't wanted enough hot tea while at home to open a fresh package of a really fine light roast oolong. Today I work up really early (brief after-dinner nap turned into overnight, guess I needed it), and after a bowl of matcha, I'm working on my first session with this FSS.

I'm doing it grandpa style in the Flower of Forgetfulness, and it is so wonderful as a contrast to the milk oolong I've been marinating in for months. It's rich enough that this small quantity of leaf tolerates several infusion slowly over a relaxed session. It's a different, more subtle, less in your face taste than the milk oolong, richer and lush, but also just a little austere. Splendid.
IMG_4248.jpg
IMG_4248.jpg (21.83 KiB) Viewed 882 times
[Edit: photo here is during the first steep, the leaves are barely opened. See the next post for fully open leaves]
Last edited by debunix on Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
debunix
Posts: 353
Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:27 am

Tue Aug 14, 2018 11:16 am

Fully open FSS leaves
34284490-DBF9-4BD3-B84C-C641E296D050.jpeg
34284490-DBF9-4BD3-B84C-C641E296D050.jpeg (243.49 KiB) Viewed 873 times
Pretty!
User avatar
Victoria
Admin
Posts: 842
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2017 3:33 pm
Location: Santa Monica, CA
Contact:

Tue Aug 14, 2018 11:31 am

Glad to see your second picture with FuShoushan’s larger leaves and stem. The first one with small torn pieces had me puzzled. Since the leaves are so thick, FF brews really nicely into a second and third day with increasingly extended day long steeps.

Enjoying HY Chen’s Charcoal Light Roasted Wild Garden DongDing. It has notes of an evergreen forest with a slightly resinous astringency, flavor and aroma found in sweet pine needles. Rich. I overstepped the second and third rounds, so added a little hot water to thin out the brew, worked well. Love the way oolong is so forgiving.
_Soggy_
Posts: 31
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:11 pm

Sat Aug 18, 2018 6:05 pm

I was drinking some Floating Leaves Nangang Baozhong earlier today. It is supposed to be an old schools style baozhong. A lot more vegetal and umami flavor. Some nice richness/creamyness. No really floral notes like other baozhong. Doesn't get too bitter(and the little that is there is welcome) either if you push it.
User avatar
Bok
Posts: 1040
Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:55 am

Thu Aug 23, 2018 12:10 am

Had a roasted Tieguanyin from China yesterday. In itself a rare thing these days to find a roasted TGY on the mainland. Less tightly rolled than its Taiwanese counterpart. Taste is no match for its small island cousin. Light, no noticeable aftertaste or other pleasant flavours. Better than the normal nuclear green Chinese TGY, but still a waste of my tea time so to speak...
Post Reply