What Pu'er Are You Drinking

Puerh and other heicha
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debunix
Posts: 1387
Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:27 am
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Sun Oct 10, 2021 11:58 am

2008 Yi Wu bamboo aged sheng from Norbu. I bought what seemed like a lot of it soon after the first taste, and I've been very pleased with it however I infuse it; I've done everything with it--gongfu in small pots to large thermos infusions. It goes well with my new to tea office tea buddies too. It's herbaceous with earthy and sweet caramel notes, and can be infused many times when the pot is as filled as Petr's unglazed bizen-ish pot is now. I started this session last night, end it will go for most of the day today, Interrupted by other teas here and there.
Andrew S
Posts: 251
Joined: Sat Jan 30, 2021 8:53 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia

Sun Oct 10, 2021 2:03 pm

@OCTO: I tend to dismiss mini-tuocha puer as being a bit of a gimmick, and I'm not familiar with any old raw examples, but yours sounds like a very nice aged brew. I was not aware that they were made as far back as the 80s; I had just assumed that they were a more recent invention.

Thanks for sharing, and for reminding me that even something as simple as a mini-tuocha can become special.

Andrew
Andrew S
Posts: 251
Joined: Sat Jan 30, 2021 8:53 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia

Sat Oct 16, 2021 7:08 pm

Trying out some 1994 Xiaguan cooked tuocha chunks that I got recently from Yee On Tea Co.

I don't drink cooked puer very often, but I do enjoy it when it is old and traditionally-stored, especially if I just want something simple and relaxing to drink without having to think too much, or if I've been unkind to myself and just need something soothing and comfortable to drink.

This one is sweet and smooth, as expected, but very refreshing and vibrant, with a long-lasting savoury aftertaste, and a bright, relaxing, potent feeling. It is the feeling that it gives me that sets it apart from younger cooked teas, which often feel 'hollow' to me, and I also like how it comes across as being fresh, and light on its feet, without that overly thick, sweet, cloying character that some cooked puer can have.

It's a very pleasant tea, and a good answer to the question that some people ask, 'Why bother to age a cooked tea?'. It would be fun to take some of these chunks to yum cha one day.

Andrew
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DailyTX
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Location: United States

Sat Oct 16, 2021 8:45 pm

@Andrew S I also gravitate towards shou more than Sheng in cold weather. I am not sure if it’s just me, I feel like my sheng tasted lighter during the winter. As to aging shou, I think it varies from fermentation level.

Another thing that captured my attention is your pot. Is this late 70s early 80s 祥興 tea shop ordered zini pot? ;)
Andrew S
Posts: 251
Joined: Sat Jan 30, 2021 8:53 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia

Sat Oct 16, 2021 9:18 pm

My cold weather drink usually tends to be yancha, and old puer tends to be a drink for lazy days.
DailyTX wrote:
Sat Oct 16, 2021 8:45 pm
Another thing that captured my attention is your pot. Is this late 70s early 80s 祥興 tea shop ordered zini pot? ;)
I believe so, unless someone proves me wrong. It's been brewing old puer for more than a decade, and I've been quite happy with it.

I got a few other puer samples from Yee On in my order, so I'll see if I can get around to trying them and posting some comments about them, in case it might be useful to anyone. I'm quite pleased with this one, though, so my expectations are high...

Andrew
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Bok
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Location: Taiwan

Sat Oct 16, 2021 9:49 pm

Andrew S wrote:
Sat Oct 16, 2021 9:18 pm

I believe so, unless someone proves me wrong. It's been brewing old puer for more than a decade
Certainly looks the part for having been diligently seasoned!
DailyTX
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Joined: Wed Jul 03, 2019 4:43 pm
Location: United States

Sat Oct 16, 2021 10:36 pm

Bok wrote:
Sat Oct 16, 2021 9:49 pm
Andrew S wrote:
Sat Oct 16, 2021 9:18 pm

I believe so, unless someone proves me wrong. It's been brewing old puer for more than a decade
Certainly looks the part for having been diligently seasoned!
👍 not much info on 祥興 pot aside from a summary from another forum. Very interesting category of yixing/zisha
DailyTX
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Location: United States

Sun Oct 17, 2021 12:57 pm

Sampling an interesting shou pu lately. Looking at the wrapper, the cake looks like it hasn't age at all. The wrapper underside has no information. It doesn't taste pre-2000, so might be production from 2001-2005? Or a possibility of counterfeit tea? The bamboo tong tied with metal wire where this cake was from has some signs of aging. Seller said the tea has been in the United States for 15+ years.
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Andrew S
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Location: Sydney, Australia

Mon Oct 18, 2021 2:36 am

@DailyTX: I guess that it is hard to tell if a tea is genuinely old (especially a cooked puer) if it has only ever lived in a fairly dry environment.

But then, if it doesn't taste 'aged' regardless of how old it actually is, I'm not sure if there is much practical use in trying to ascertain if it is genuinely old, at least beyond trying to work out if it wasn't objectively worth the price paid.

Andrew
DailyTX
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Mon Oct 18, 2021 2:41 pm

Andrew S wrote:
Mon Oct 18, 2021 2:36 am
DailyTX: I guess that it is hard to tell if a tea is genuinely old (especially a cooked puer) if it has only ever lived in a fairly dry environment.

But then, if it doesn't taste 'aged' regardless of how old it actually is, I'm not sure if there is much practical use in trying to ascertain if it is genuinely old, at least beyond trying to work out if it wasn't objectively worth the price paid.

Andrew
@Andrew S
The dry and colder environment definitely make tea stored in the West difficult to date. And this shou was highly fermented before pressing into cake, so it's hard to tell the quality of the leaves. On a positive note, this tea has a clear ruby red tea broth with a hint of sweetness, zero fermentation taste, and lasted for 6-8 rounds. I would say it has went through some transformation. It's an everyday drinking tea price, so no complaint at all.
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