Gyokuro recommendations

Non-oxidized tea
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Masterjeff
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Wed Sep 06, 2023 5:11 am

Victoria wrote:
Sun Aug 06, 2023 12:00 am
It’s only early August now. Gyokuro is aged in cool storage 3-6-12 months so typically new iterations are sold after September, into the following year. Reading through this thread and Green Tea forum will have highlights from years past. I have found Gyokuro to be consistent in quality with vendors I frequent and post about 🍃.
So would you say now is a bad time to get gyokuro from o-cha? Under year it says 2023 but I am unsure if thats just the 2023 batch made from last years harvest and if I should wait a few more weeks?
Last edited by Victoria on Wed Sep 06, 2023 11:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Mod edit: cleaned up quote
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Victoria
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Wed Sep 06, 2023 11:16 am

Masterjeff wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2023 5:11 am
Victoria wrote:
Sun Aug 06, 2023 12:00 am
It’s only early August now. Gyokuro is aged in cool storage 3-6-12 months so typically new iterations are sold after September, into the following year. Reading through this thread and Green Tea forum will have highlights from years past. I have found Gyokuro to be consistent in quality with vendors I frequent and post about 🍃.
So would you say now is a bad time to get gyokuro from o-cha? Under year it says 2023 but I am unsure if thats just the 2023 batch made from last years harvest and if I should wait a few more weeks?
Now is fine, I was just about to do the same thing. I’m not exactly sure how O-Cha labels harvest date/aging of Gyokuro, maybe shoot Kevin that question and let us know. In the past I’ve always ordered Gyokuro after September, but now I think it’s probably fine before that as well since harvest is probably March or early April 2023.
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Victoria
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Wed Sep 06, 2023 3:06 pm

@Masterjeff (curious choice of handle :| ) I went ahead and contacted Kevin for some clarification and will share his reply.
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Masterjeff
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Thu Sep 07, 2023 6:06 am

Victoria wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2023 3:06 pm
Masterjeff (curious choice of handle :| ) I went ahead and contacted Kevin for some clarification and will share his reply.
I hope my handle doesnt give a poor impression, its just an old nickname a friend gave me since I'd always have the highscore on this one game at the arcade :)
Thanks for contacting him I really appreciate it, I didn't want to make a large order just for the new batch to be listed.
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Victoria
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Thu Sep 07, 2023 12:52 pm

Victoria wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2023 11:16 am
Masterjeff wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2023 5:11 am
Victoria wrote:
Sun Aug 06, 2023 12:00 am
It’s only early August now. Gyokuro is aged in cool storage 3-6-12 months so typically new iterations are sold after September, into the following year. Reading through this thread and Green Tea forum will have highlights from years past. I have found Gyokuro to be consistent in quality with vendors I frequent and post about 🍃.
So would you say now is a bad time to get gyokuro from o-cha? Under year it says 2023 but I am unsure if thats just the 2023 batch made from last years harvest and if I should wait a few more weeks?
Now is fine, I was just about to do the same thing. I’m not exactly sure how O-Cha labels harvest date/aging of Gyokuro, maybe shoot Kevin that question and let us know. In the past I’ve always ordered Gyokuro after September, but now I think it’s probably fine before that as well since harvest is probably March or early April 2023.
Kevin of O-Cha just kindly replied. I asked about Tsuen specifically because it’s usually his highest grade gyokuro;
The higher quality gyokuro are aged under refrigeration until around September or October. Tsuen does this. Other company gyokuro are sometimes (not always) blended with previous year’s harvest and current year’s harvest in summer when the original runs out. Then some companies start selling “shincha” gyokuro in May, which is ridiculous. It depends on every tea and the company. Tsuen usually waits until minimum September but sometimes even November. Basically, the higher quality you get, the higher the price, the longer they wait.

I think September is fine to order Tsuen gyokuro, it’s aged already pretty well by then.

Regards,
Kevin
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Bok
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Fri Sep 08, 2023 12:53 am

So basicaly the same concept as the "ware house" Tokusen Gyokuru? That was nicer than regular Gyokuru
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Victoria
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Fri Sep 08, 2023 1:15 am

Bok wrote:
Fri Sep 08, 2023 12:53 am
So basicaly the same concept as the "ware house" Tokusen Gyokuru? That was nicer than regular Gyokuru
Well, there are various grades of Gyokuro for sure, even though the expense of shading for 45 days is already costly, then presorting only the finest leaves and then time needed for aging. Windowless traditional thick stone walled tea “Kura” ( 蔵 or 倉) warehouse or storehouse can still be found Japan (many are repurposed today as shops etc), they were cooler than outdoor temp and used to store and later age teas.
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Bok
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Fri Sep 08, 2023 1:39 am

Victoria wrote:
Fri Sep 08, 2023 1:15 am
Bok wrote:
Fri Sep 08, 2023 12:53 am
So basicaly the same concept as the "ware house" Tokusen Gyokuru? That was nicer than regular Gyokuru
Well, there are various grades of Gyokuro for sure, even though the expense of shading for 45 days is already costly, then presorting only the finest leaves and then time needed for aging. Windowless traditional thick stone walled tea “Kura” ( 蔵 or 倉) warehouse or storehouse can still be found Japan (many are repurposed today as shops etc), they were cooler than outdoor temp and used to store and later age teas.
Thanks! Interesting
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Victoria
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Fri Sep 08, 2023 1:18 pm

Since this thread is about Gyokuro Recommendations, moved last few posts on Vintage Gyokuro aging to;
Japanese Green Tea: Aged, Roasted, Fermented.
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