What Green Are You Drinking

Non-oxidized tea
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teatray
Posts: 37
Joined: Sun Dec 12, 2021 4:46 am
Location: Bulgaria

Fri Jan 14, 2022 11:15 am

Baisao wrote:
Thu Jan 13, 2022 11:10 pm
I’ve made Tobetto a lot. I feel that 60° is spot on. It’s a very nice tea but unforgiving of hotter temperatures except in later steeps. You should be able to get 6 steepings from it, so you do get your money’s worth.
Indeed, #5 and #6 (86°C for 2 mins) were both very enjoyable, even though the pot had to wait for half a day. #7 at 98°C for several minutes didn't bring much. I ate a bit of the tea, it was quite nice, too, crispy fresh.
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debunix
Posts: 1447
Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:27 am
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Fri Jan 21, 2022 10:30 am

Drinking Obubu tencha this morning. Smooth, mellow, vegetal, a hint of cooked peas and nuttiness but not to the degree I so often find unpleasant in Long Jing. Mmmm.
Stevelaughs
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Joined: Mon Jan 10, 2022 12:03 am
Location: outside Boston

Fri Jan 21, 2022 6:11 pm

Today I drank the “pre-rain” Pan’an County Long Jing 43 from Red Blossom Tea Co. This is not Xi Hu Long Jing, but Yue Zhou Long Jing.

I’m still pretty new to Long Jing, so it’s hard to compare it to anything else. HOWEVER, I will say I tasted a distinct note of Parmesan cheese especially present in the finish LOL. It had a hint of that sharp, salty, umami note in the sides of the mouth and back of the throat. But overall it was fairly light and buttery with a reserved nuttiness. It’s not the prettiest tea (lots of broken leaves), but I think it represents a pretty good value in the western Long Jing market today.

Have brewed grandpa style, and using two gong dao bei. The umami/Parmesan note came out more using the gong dao bei.
Stevelaughs
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Location: outside Boston

Fri Jan 21, 2022 7:26 pm

Nova02 wrote:
Thu Jul 29, 2021 8:57 am
I will say that the color is a little inconsistent, with around 15% of the leaves a lime green as opposed to the pale yellow that the rest of the leaves are. I don't know if this is a product of the lighter roasting that this dragonwell has compared to others I've seen, or if it detrimentally affects the quality of this tea. Any answers to those questions would be appreciated!
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Would love to know more about this too. I've heard that most high quality chinese green teas should not have that deep verdant green color, but more of a pale yellow-green color. Here is some of what I found:

"The yellower the leaves the better, indicating less chlorophyll and younger buds which is a desirable trait for this style of tea."

"The earliest pickings are much more yellow in color and full of yellow and silver down. The leaves are quite small. Later pickings have less down and a more yellow green color with variagated darker shades. Only summer tea is going to be deep, deep green. Avoid overly green Dragonwell, as it is most likely not the real article."

"More sunlight exposure and higher temperatures mean more chlorophyll activated in the leaf and a greener color and flavor."

https://verdanttea.com/a-buyers-guide-t ... n-varietal

^^ I don't patronize Verdant Tea... I know there's a lot of drama surrounding Gushu-Gate LMAO, but their long jing buyer's guide has some solid information for beginners. I'm considering purchasing some of their long jing, in spite of everything haha
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Baisao
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Fri Jan 21, 2022 8:09 pm

“More sunlight exposure and higher temperatures mean more chlorophyll activated in the leaf and a greener color and flavor."
And yet gyokuro is as green as they come and is grown with shade.
Stevelaughs
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Location: outside Boston

Sun Jan 23, 2022 4:36 pm

Baisao wrote:
Fri Jan 21, 2022 8:09 pm
“More sunlight exposure and higher temperatures mean more chlorophyll activated in the leaf and a greener color and flavor."
And yet gyokuro is as green as they come and is grown with shade.
Yeah, I’m really not sure. I don’t know enough about plant biology and photosynthesis and chlorophyll production to analyze the differences. But I believe gyokuro production regions are warmer climate, lower elevation, later harvest... and the artificial shading of the tea plants spurs a chemical reaction in the leaf which causes an increase in the production of chlorophyll. But don’t they naturally see more sunlight during the growing season anyway?

IDK obviously cultivation techniques are highly specific to that region and style of tea and are really beyond my knowledge base.

Any plant biologists out there who want to shed a little light on this? Lol
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