Search found 155 matches

by mbanu
Mon Oct 26, 2020 9:07 am
Forum: Additional Regions
Topic: What exactly is a british teapot?
Replies: 28
Views: 607

Re: What exactly is a british teapot?

Reading through this thread it reminds me of a decade-old question I was asked by a customer: Did the British misunderstand what a faircup was for and, instead, simply repurposed it to hold the dairy? I had no answers then and I still don't now, but all this conversation on design and intent has ma...
by mbanu
Fri Oct 23, 2020 10:48 pm
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: American "bed & breakfast" tea-culture
Replies: 14
Views: 627

Re: American "bed & breakfast" tea-culture

Another split seems to be based on how French-inspired the inn is. On the far end, there were inns that saw themselves as miniature versions of the old grand hotels, where the proprietors tried to make copies of the sort of food made by the French-trained chefs at these hotels. I'm not sure if this ...
by mbanu
Fri Oct 23, 2020 11:25 am
Forum: Groups, Clubs, & Events
Topic: "Junior League" American tea-culture?
Replies: 0
Views: 108

"Junior League" American tea-culture?

I keep coming across tea-related books published by them, such as "More than a Tea Party" by the Junior League of Boston, or "Tea-Time at the Masters" [Golf Tournament] by the Junior League of Augusta. Apparently they were started in 1901 in New York as the "Junior League for the Promotion of the Se...
by mbanu
Wed Oct 21, 2020 12:50 pm
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: American "bed & breakfast" tea-culture
Replies: 14
Views: 627

Re: American "bed & breakfast" tea-culture

Another interesting thing I noticed was a "tea and incense" connection. American B&Bs don't use incense, but many seem to use boil pots. The Mainstay Inn in Cape May. New Jersey suggested a mix of pineapple juice, apple cider, ginger, cinnamon, cloves, allspice, and "pickling spice". I think this ma...
by mbanu
Tue Oct 20, 2020 7:50 pm
Forum: Additional Regions
Topic: What exactly is a british teapot?
Replies: 28
Views: 607

Re: What exactly is a british teapot?

A British teapot is designed for making the teas that Brits prefer. In particular: 1. British teapots are meant for Assamica teas that can oversteep. This is why when the teapot became less popular, the alternatives all revolved around this requirement that after 5 minutes the brewed tea must not be...
by mbanu
Mon Oct 19, 2020 6:30 pm
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Discount means Failure
Replies: 8
Views: 427

Re: Discount means Failure

I think this is related to the format of the purchase. Discounts are studied in a supermarket type environment, where there is a good chance that the shopper will be left alone until they check out. Many teashops follow the older labor-intensive way of selling, where there is a salesman following yo...
by mbanu
Sat Oct 17, 2020 1:46 pm
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: American "bed & breakfast" tea-culture
Replies: 14
Views: 627

Re: American "bed & breakfast" tea-culture

One interesting thing is the number of American-style "high tea" recipes (heavy meals with tea). I guess this was to meet the need of "Well, I know you're a bed & breakfast, but I don't have a dinner engagement tonight; do you have anything more substantial than cakes and cream cheese sandwiches tha...
by mbanu
Fri Oct 16, 2020 11:28 am
Forum: Groups, Clubs, & Events
Topic: Red Hat Society
Replies: 13
Views: 744

Re: Red Hat Society

It is not always an easy to understand culture, I think... Usually their philosophy is explained through poems. In addition to "Warning" by Jenny Joseph, another commonly quoted poem is "Dust if You Must": Dust if you must, but wouldn't it be better To paint a picture, or write a letter, Bake a cake...
by mbanu
Thu Oct 15, 2020 12:09 pm
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: American "bed & breakfast" tea-culture
Replies: 14
Views: 627

Re: American "bed & breakfast" tea-culture

I wish it were easier to find out more info about this magazine; Greco name-drops it, and it seems like it was around for the birth of this tea-culture, but Google has very little to say about it.
by mbanu
Wed Oct 14, 2020 2:57 pm
Forum: Storage & Organization
Topic: puerh: to air or not to air?
Replies: 19
Views: 687

Re: puerh: to air or not to air?

The blogger is sort of describing two separate processes at the same time. Breaking apart a cake and mixing together leaves from the inside and outside loose is actually a version of a well-known tea practice called "bulking". This equalizes the flavor of the tea. However, this is distinct from expo...
by mbanu
Tue Oct 13, 2020 6:27 pm
Forum: Groups, Clubs, & Events
Topic: Red Hat Society
Replies: 13
Views: 744

Re: Red Hat Society

Apparently they started schisming in the late 2000s when it looked like the group was commercializing: https://www.dailycomet.com/article/DA/20091031/Entertainment/608095879/DC There is also the "Ladies of the Hat", "Kaleidoscope Circles", and the "Black Hat Banshees" (this one reminded me of the ol...
by mbanu
Tue Oct 13, 2020 9:33 am
Forum: News, Publications, & Research
Topic: Books of the late 80s to early 00s Anglo-American tea revival
Replies: 0
Views: 97

Books of the late 80s to early 00s Anglo-American tea revival

I feel like there ought to be a better subject name, but I don't know what it is. Basically, starting around the late 80s, a bunch of British authors started writing books on British tea-culture that were specifically targeted to American audiences. The best relationship I can think of to this is so...
by mbanu
Mon Oct 12, 2020 9:14 pm
Forum: Groups, Clubs, & Events
Topic: American "faculty teas"?
Replies: 5
Views: 253

Re: American "faculty teas"?

I think this is what makes the idea so fascinating to me -- America is a majority coffee-drinking country, but this academic tea tradition was created and still persists, even if the tea itself is often forgotten in the process. The only Yale tea trivia I know is that Mark T. Wendell blends a custom...
by mbanu
Sat Oct 10, 2020 11:39 am
Forum: Groups, Clubs, & Events
Topic: American "faculty teas"?
Replies: 5
Views: 253

American "faculty teas"?

Apparently there is an academic tradition at many American universities of "faculty teas", either for faculty to collaborate with each other in an informal setting, or to allow students (especially graduate students) to talk with the faculty of their department in a setting that is not so task-focus...
by mbanu
Fri Oct 09, 2020 1:22 pm
Forum: News, Publications, & Research
Topic: Tea Recipe Books?
Replies: 5
Views: 223

Re: Tea Recipe Books?

Another two recipe books that aren't really recipe books, "Tea Celebrations" by Alexandra Stoddard and "Tea & Etiquette" by Dorothea Johnson. I almost feel like their ought to be a sub-category of "Decoy Recipe" books to describe these. Tea Celebrations was one of the first tea books I've read where...