Search found 118 matches

by rdl
Sun Feb 14, 2021 8:43 pm
Forum: Japan
Topic: Meoto Yunomi Identification (and Suggestions for others)
Replies: 1
Views: 87

Re: Meoto Yunomi Identification (and Suggestions for others)

Japanese teaware can be expensive, but to invest in a new set that you buy (together) and know the artist and remember the day you received them, as the years pass happily and they fill not only with tea but memories. However, your pictured set are beautiful cups and for that reason alone they will ...
by rdl
Fri Jan 15, 2021 11:05 am
Forum: China & Taiwan
Topic: Young Chinese girls revive 1,200-year-old porcelain leaf cup making techniques
Replies: 20
Views: 815

Re: Young Chinese girls revive 1,200-year-old porcelain leaf cup making techniques

I don't mean to sidetrack from highlighting these Chinese potters, and apologize if this is the wrong place, but I will just put the suggestion out there that Suzuki-san at Kugogama, Daisenyaki can be contacted, or possibly through magokorodo on ebay, if purchasing the Chinese teacups isn't practica...
by rdl
Thu Jan 14, 2021 7:07 pm
Forum: China & Taiwan
Topic: Young Chinese girls revive 1,200-year-old porcelain leaf cup making techniques
Replies: 20
Views: 815

Re: Young Chinese girls revive 1,200-year-old porcelain leaf cup making techniques

you're not thinking about translation. we in english don't use, currently, a word, nor have the will, to imply the age and often marital status of a woman. in chinese they do.
by rdl
Thu Jan 14, 2021 9:47 am
Forum: China & Taiwan
Topic: Young Chinese girls revive 1,200-year-old porcelain leaf cup making techniques
Replies: 20
Views: 815

Re: Young Chinese girls revive 1,200-year-old porcelain leaf cup making techniques

Toshiyuki Suzuki, making Daisenyaki, has been researching centuries old techniques that are presently not fully understood. Here is a sake cup I purchased from him during one of my visits.
Very interesting article, thanks for posting.
by rdl
Sat Dec 19, 2020 11:05 pm
Forum: Additional Regions
Topic: The Hall China Company and classic American teapot designs
Replies: 7
Views: 623

Re: The Hall China Company and classic American teapot designs

Upton Tea is working with Hall China and Homer Laughlin to produce their teapots. When they first announced the collaboration they did a really interesting historical write up of these companies until the present. mbanu, I have been enjoying reading your research and discoveries that you have been p...
by rdl
Sun Nov 22, 2020 12:02 am
Forum: Japan
Topic: Why are Chawans so expensive?
Replies: 9
Views: 702

Re: Why are Chawans so expensive?

I'd like to venture an answer from the knowledge I have gleaned over the years. All pottery is made with great aesthetic care and attention. Different pieces have different challenges. But when you consider a chawan, that object is in a class by itself. I know potters will sit in front of their whee...
by rdl
Sat Nov 21, 2020 9:19 pm
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Has the internet lost interest in British-style tea?
Replies: 19
Views: 1093

Re: Has the internet lost interest in British-style tea?

I'd like to clarify my use of the word "blend." I agree with Ethan Kurland that consistency in taste is maintained by blending teas. I was referring to tea type blends like Scottish Blend. To quote from the Adagio website: "Richly blended with Assam, Keemun, Yunnan, and Sri Lankan full-leaf teas, yo...
by rdl
Sat Nov 21, 2020 5:40 pm
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Has the internet lost interest in British-style tea?
Replies: 19
Views: 1093

Re: Has the internet lost interest in British-style tea?

Interesting topic and responses. I appreciate the guardians of the leaf, and the historians replied, but to my mind British style is no more than a larger pot, oxidised tea steeped 3 minutes or so, and not re-steeped. Sugar, milk, lemon may be added, but never by the purist. And neither will teabags...
by rdl
Sat Nov 14, 2020 5:31 pm
Forum: Additional Regions
Topic: What exactly is a british teapot?
Replies: 30
Views: 1904

Re: What exactly is a british teapot?

I read something interesting in Tom Standage's A History of the World in 6 Glasses. Wedgwood was able to out compete Chinese porcelain, which then stopped being imported in 1791. Anything after that could be, whether copied, influenced, or based on, be considered British. Teapots included.
by rdl
Wed Nov 11, 2020 10:40 am
Forum: Japan
Topic: Hagi
Replies: 129
Views: 45485

Re: Hagi

Also how long do we soak hagi ware before using them on a daily basis? And is it hot, lukewarm or cold water? Or do we just rise it with hot water afterwards? In my own use of Hagiyaki I have only followed the instructions of soaking a new piece before the first use. After, I have only rinsed the c...
by rdl
Tue Oct 20, 2020 9:15 am
Forum: Additional Regions
Topic: What exactly is a british teapot?
Replies: 30
Views: 1904

Re: What exactly is a british teapot?

Bok, The Brown Betty, as I referenced above but wanted to point out again as this is what I find most interesting. The local red clay that was discovered to best retain heat, that attention to and advancement of clay in the preparation of English style tea. It was always a passion and science. It s...
by rdl
Tue Oct 20, 2020 8:47 am
Forum: Additional Regions
Topic: What exactly is a british teapot?
Replies: 30
Views: 1904

Re: What exactly is a british teapot?

Bok,
The Brown Betty, as I referenced above but wanted to point out again as this is what I find most interesting. The local red clay that was discovered to best retain heat, that attention to and advancement of clay in the preparation of English style tea. It was always a passion and science.
by rdl
Tue Oct 20, 2020 8:04 am
Forum: Additional Regions
Topic: What exactly is a british teapot?
Replies: 30
Views: 1904

Re: What exactly is a british teapot?

From wikipedia: "...red clay that was discovered in the Stoke-on-Trent area of Britain, in 1695. This clay resulted in a ceramic which seemed to retain heat better and so found use as the material for the teapot as early as the seventeenth century..." https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_Betty_(tea...
by rdl
Sun Oct 11, 2020 7:01 pm
Forum: Japan
Topic: Hagi ware and absorption of colour/odour
Replies: 9
Views: 827

Re: Hagi ware and absorption of colour/odour

l will try to clarify. First, any cup used for coffee and not washed well will accumulate coffee oils and so will certainly impart flavor on any liquid less strong than coffee. My point about the hagiyaki coffee cups is that they don't appear to craze or have a surface glaze for flavors to accumulat...
by rdl
Wed Oct 07, 2020 6:32 pm
Forum: Japan
Topic: Hagi ware and absorption of colour/odour
Replies: 9
Views: 827

Re: Hagi ware and absorption of colour/odour

This isn't an answer but an observation. Of all the different Hagiyaki I own and use, your question depends on several factors. For example I have a cup that is almost like rakuyaki, very soft and absorbent. I am sure there would be dark staining from darker tea. Another two identical cups I use for...